Tag Archives: dog safety

Poinsettia … Holiday Friend or Foe?

The holidays are coming! Trees, decorations and beautiful, festive plants are appearing everywhere!

But, if you have dogs in your home, are you hesitant to bring the traditional poinsettia plant into your home?

It’s true that poinsettias have traditionally been considered poisonous to pets.

However, the truth is that they are “non” to “mildly” toxic. Poinsettias are actually more prone to giving your pet a mild rash if they brush against it; or, if they ingest it, just mild-to-no stomach discomfort.

So go ahead and enjoy this gorgeous plant!

Learn more about which holiday blooms and buds are toxic to Fido by clicking here.

RECALL: Smallbatch Pets Frozen Dog Sliders

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Smallbatch Pets Frozen Dog Food Recall

Just two hours after our recent post about making your own dog treats (due to the increased recalls in dog foods/treats), a new recall came to our attention from the FDA (actually released on March 26th) about Smallbatch Pets Inc. voluntarily recalling one lot of their frozen Duckbatch Sliders (for dogs) due to potential salmonella and listeria.  (Interestingly, there’s nothing posted on the SmallBatch website at the time of writing this post.)

According to the FDA release, “the affected products are sold frozen in 3-pound bags and can be identified with the following manufacturing codes:

  • Lot #CO27
  • UPC #713757339001
  • Best By Date: 01/27/2017

and were distributed to retail pet food stores in California, Colorado, Oregon and Washington.”

According to the FDA release, there have been no pet or consumer illnesses reported from this product at this time. The recall was issued after “routine testing” by the FDA from a sample taken at a distributor. Eighty cases of this specific product lot were sold between the dates of February 23rd through March 10th.

Consumers who touched this contaminated product should thoroughly wash their hands and disinfect any surfaces exposed to this product. Human symptoms from being infected with salmonella and/or listeria include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Infected pets may be lethargic, have a decreased appetite and abdominal pain and also exhibit diarrhea, fever and vomiting.

If you purchased frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders from the affected Lot #CO27, do not feed or touch the product and return to the place of purchase for a full refund or throw them out where your dog, animals or humans cannot reach them.

To read the voluntary recall release in its entirety, go to the FDA Recalls & Safety Alerts Page.

Consumers may also call Smallbatch Pets Inc., at 888-507-2712 or email them at info@smallbatchpets.com.

Dog Food Recall: Purina Beneful and Pro Plan

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Purina Beneful and Pro Plan Dog Food Recall

The Dog Food Advisor website just announced that Nestle Purina has issued a voluntary recall of the following products due to insufficient vitamins and minerals.

  • Beneful Prepared Meals Wet Dog Food in 10-oz. Tubs
  • Beneful Chopped Blends Wet Dog Food in 10-oz. Tubs
  • Pro Plan Savory Meals Wet Dog Food in 10-oz. Tubs (limited to five varieties)

Purina recommends you discard any of the affected products you may have and contact them for a refund at 1-800-877-7919.

To learn more about this recall,  go to Dog Food Advisor and Purina’s News Center.

To see the full list of recalled products, click here to view the PDF file.

February Means Having Love for Your Pets Too!

For most of us, say the word “February” and one of the next things to pop into our mind is “Valentine’s Day.” And while we would never downplay the importance of human love (and memorializing it with copious amounts of chocolate, flowers and sparkly trinkets), did you realize that February also focuses on loving those ever-present critters in our life, our pets?

While the entire month is dedicated to “Pet Dental Health” and “Responsible Pet Owners,” there’s also “Love Your Pet Day” (coming up on February 20th) and “National Dog Biscuit Day” (coming up on February 23rd).

Yes, the month of February is full of reminders to love and protect our beloved pets.

From proper socialization to finding the right diet; from the best positive training to effectively controlling parasites; and from regular vet visits to making sure their golden years are as smooth and pain-free as possible, our pets are a huge presence – and responsibility – in our life.

So as you go through the rest of this month and celebrate that special bond with your particular pet, consider brushing up on the latest research on medical care, best food practices and even emergency measures in the face of a disaster to ensure you love and protect your pet to the best of your ability.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to make a couple of buckets of dog treats for my Great Danes for “National Dog Biscuit Day” . . .

Are Holiday Treats Dog-Friendly?

The holidays are quickly approaching with mouth-watering smells and delectable seasonal treats!

Something else is coming too … sad, SAD puppy eyes!

While most of us will probably indulge during the season, it doesn’t necessarily mean our dogs should follow our lead.

You may actually be surprised by some of the holiday foods and/or ingredients your four-legged family member should not partake of; below is a quick list.


Want to know about additional foods and WHY they are bad for your dog?

Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!

Want a dog-friendly treat you can make in advance for those oh-so-sad puppy eyes?

Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!


iStock_000013402168XSmallAnd remember … the smaller the dog, the faster – and more toxic – the adverse effect.

So keep these items out of reach of your inquisitive (and always  hungry) resident canine!

  • Pumpkin Pie, Filling or Mix
  • Avocados and/or guacamole
  • Onions and garlic (included powdered, raw, cooked and dehydrated)
  • Grapes, raisins and currants
  • Fat Trimmings
  • Unbaked yeast dough

Want to know more? Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!

Thank You Petco! NO more Chinese Pet Treats!

Petco has finally stepped up to the plate and removed any remaining Chinese-made canine and feline treats from its stores and website due to fears that thousands of pets have been sickened and killed since 2007.

(There have been more than 4,800 complaints of pet illnesses, including deaths, from Chinese-made chicken, duck or sweet potato jerky treats.)

Read more

Fireworks are no laughing matter for your pet …

FireworksThe 4th of July is a festive holiday of fun, sun, BBQ’s and of course, awe-inspring fireworks! But, as you make your plans for the upcoming holiday, what are your plans to keep your pets safe, happy and secure?

  • First, leave your pets at home and inside a quiet and escape-proof room; one with closed and covered (or better yet, no windows; dogs have been known to go through windows when frightened and trying to escape). Pet-proof the room from anxious chewing or potential hazards if your pet does become anxious or fearful. Even the most well-trained, calmest dogs (and cats) can do unexpected things when afraid.
  • NEVER leave your pets in your car.
  • Keep pets away from all alcohol, hot BBQ’s and food (including condiments like mustard (induces vomiting) and ketchup (induces vomiting, fever, weakness and collapse).
  • Keep holiday decorations out of reach (including fireworks and glowsticks).
  • Consider using a Thundershirt to help keep your dog calm.
  • Use a dogsitter to keep your dog company.
  • Make sure your dog can access their “safe place” (crate) and leave a frozen kong toy filled with peanut butter to keep them busy and distracted from the loud noises outside. Do NOT crate an anxious dog as this may escalate their fear and frantic attempts at escaping.
  • Play soothing music or “white noise” to help drown out loud noise.
  • For animals with severe anxiety during the 4th of July holiday, talk to your vet about potential medication or homeopathic options to help keep them calm.
  • Make sure your pet has ID tags and is microchipped in case they still find a way to run away.