Category Archives: cat

Who is the Better Pet Parent?

 

It’s undeniable, we love our pets! Most of us even regard our pets as an integral part of our family instead of just animals who share our home.

In return, our pets reward us with unconditional love and devotion each and every day.

 

But, Who is the Better Pet Parent?

Since pets can’t voice their opinions, Porch.com tried to do it for them in a recent survey of over 1,000 pet parents living with their partner to find out, who IS the better pet parent!


What Kind of Pet Parent are You?


From which gender has the better pet parenting skills, who assumes most of the responsibility and day-to-day care for their pets to what pet parents fight over, the results may – or may not – reveal your own belief of who is the better pet parent!

 

Click here to see the full survey results at Porch.com!

 

 

Taking Care of our Dogs During Coronavirus

Greetings from Bella and Dublin!

Woofs from Bella and Dublin!

It’s definitely a crazy time and lots of conflicting information coupled with lots of uncertainty!

Like you, we are hunkered down here in Northern Nevada and waiting for the “all clear” signal to go back to living our lives “normally.”

But in the meantime, I’m bonding even closer with the fur-kids (IF that’s even possible!), learning a lot through webinars and taking a serious look at new, creative ways to do business to minimize personal contact. Yes, it often feels frustrating and very uncertain, but times of hardship and “necessity” are invaluable in ramping up new ways of doing things!

I’m sure, like me, you’ve heard more than enough about the coronavirus! I would like to (quickly) address just one area to hopefully dispel some misinformation and stop the unfortunate actions on the part of some pet owners. This is from our upcoming April newsletter.

 

Can My Pet Get and Pass Along Coronavirus?

Sadly, there are reports of people abandoning their pets because of the unfounded belief that their dogs and cats can get, carry and transmit the coronavirus.

In a nutshell, this is not true and there is NO evidence backing up this claim. So please keep your pet in your home with you where they belong.


CLARIFICATION: There IS a Canine Coronavirus (CCV), but the current outbreak has nothing to do with the CCV virus.

Can My Pet Transmit Coronavirus?


The WHO, CDC, AVMA and AKC all agree there is no imminent threat from our pets for transmitting the Coronavirus. The CDC says the virus is spreading from person-to-person only. The AVMA also assures that petting a dog’s fur is low-risk because the virus survives best on smooth surfaces.

 

Remember, the coronavirus is transmitted via respiratory droplets from human-to-human. So follow the AKC’s advice to consistently follow basic hygiene in thoroughly washing your hands with soap and water before and after contact with any pet. 

 

For further information, watch the “COVID-19 Update on Pets” video with Rodney Habib, Dr. Karen Becker and Dr. Sarah Caddy of the University of Cambridge.

Ok, ’nuff said!

 

Play and Engage Your Dog!

The pets of our lives enhance and enrich our lives especially in uncertain times like these!

Instead of stressing out over every news report, spend extra quality time with your beloved pet and enhance your overall Engage Your Dog With Some New Tricks!relationship and bond! Below are some great ideas to keep you and your dog active even as you shelter-in-place.

People-Oriented Dog Play

    1. Hide-and-Seek
    2. Tug-of-War

Object-Oriented Dog Play

    1. Find It
    2. Put it Away
    3. Fetch

Task-Oriented Dog Play

    1. Tricks
    2. Puzzle-Solving
    3. Dig Here

To learn more about other games to play with your resident canine, click on the links below.

 


As we all move through this uncertain time, stay safe, healthy and positive. Remember, this too shall pass.

Remember, this too shall pass.

 

RECALL: Icelandic Plus Dog & Cat Treats

 

Thankfully it’s been pretty quiet when it comes to product recalls for our beloved pets.

But on Monday, March 23rd, the FDA published a new recall for Whole Capelin Fish Pet Treats made by IcelandicPlus LLC of Fort Washington, PA. The recall was issued because some of the fish “exceeded the FDA compliance guidelines for fish larger than 5 inches.” While there have been no reports of illness as of the date of publication, Icelandic+ is cooperating with the recall because of a possible health risk. 

 

Icelandic+

The FDA has determined that salt-cured, dried, or fermented un-eviscerated fish larger than 5 inches have been linked to outbreaks of botulism poisoning in humans between 1981 and 1987 and again in 1991. 

Icelandic Plus says that as of March 23rd, “there have been no reported illnesses of dogs, cats or people in connection with the recalled product.” In addition, there are no positive test results for Clostridium botulinum (botulism poisoning) in connection with the Capelin product.

IcealandicPlus-Capelin-Whole-Fish-Pet-Treat-Recall.jpg

The recalled product comes in a:

  1. Clear plastic tube (2.5 ounces); or
  2. Clear plastic bag (1.5 or 2.5 ounces)

Both the tubes and packages are printed with either:

  • Icelandic+ Capelin WHOLE FISH, PURE FISH TREATS FOR DOGS; or
  • Icelandic+ Capelin PURE FISH TREATS FOR CATS.

The recalled UPC codes are:

  • 8 5485400775 9;
  • 8 5485400711 7; and
  • 8 5485400757 5.

The recalled lot numbers are 02/2020 to 02/2022.

The Entire USA is Included in the Recall

The recalled product was shipped to distributors for sale to independent retail pet specialty stores throughout the USA.

 

Botulism Poisoning: What You Need to Know

The botulism toxin can cause severe symptoms including death in both animals eating tainted products as well as people handling the contaminated product or coming in contact with exposed and tainted surfaces.

Common symptoms of botulism poisoning include:

  • Dizziness;
  • Blurred or double vision;
  • Trouble speaking, swallowing or breathing;
  • Muscle weakness;
  • Distended abdomen; and
  • Constipation.

Pets or people experiencing any of these symptoms should seek immediate medical help.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop feeding any of the recalled products and return it to the store where it was purchased for a refund.  Consumers may contact the company at 857-246-9559, Monday – Friday from 8am-5pm EST.

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

© 2020. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

Dog CPR: How to Do It Safely

The Steps for Safely Performing CPR on Your Dog

Image by Luisella Planeta Leoni from Pixabay

 

No one likes to expect the unexpected.

But when you’re faced with a life-threatening emergency requiring K9 CPR, proper preparation may be all that stands between life and death for that dog.

 

 

Dog CPR Involves Artificial Resuscitation

Image by Pet Safety Crusader


Click here to learn more at the Your Pet’s Au Pair blog: “How to Safely Perform CPR on Your Dog.”


LEARN Basic First Aid and CPR from the comfort of your couch!

Sign up for the upcoming Virtual First Aid and CPR class hosted by The Pet Safety Crusader!

(Register before February 14th for the February 22nd class!)

Dog & Cat First Aid & CPR

Dog and Cat First Aid & CPR by The Pet Safety Crusader

Guest Blog: Ideas for Local Animal Shelters During the Holidays

Help Animal Shelters During Christmas

It’s December and the Season for Giving!

It’s also a wonderful time to think about our local animal shelters. 

 

For most of us, the holidays come with colder weather. As I write this, here in Wisconsin, it’s only 6 degrees! Sadly, this time of year also sees an increased number of dogs and cats in need of shelter. Since shelters usually operate from donations, whatever you can give goes a long way in helping homeless pets.

 

Ideas for Giving to Your Local Shelter

Give Love and Attention to Shelter Pets

Your Time – All dogs and cats need attention, cuddle time and exercise. Especially during the holidays, shelters and rescues are always looking for extra volunteers to help keep the animals feeling loved and well-cared for.

Food – Both canines and felines eat at least twice a day. That is a lot of food for a shelter! Depending on age and diet needs, they typically will accept a variety of quality foods both dry and wet along with treats. Other foods a shelter can typically use include peanut butter (please make sure it’s xylitol-free), fresh veggies and fruits, canned baby food and tuna. Call your local shelter first to see what they are currently accepting.

Spare Blankets, Pillows and Towels – Shelters can always use these items for their crates and bedding. They also need rags, newspapers and kitty litter.

Toys – Shelters can always use toys to help the dogs (and cats) stay happy, mentally stimulated and active. Kong toys, balls or puzzles are great, so are gently used stuffed animals! Do you have toys that your dog or cat refuses to play with? Donate them!Donate Crates and Carriers to Local Shelters

Crates and Carriers – Both dogs and cats love a secure den. Are you no longer using your dog crate or cat carrier? Donate it!  You can help a shelter animal feel safer, especially in a busy shelter where things may seem scary and overwhelming.

Other items you could give include:

  • Food and water bowls;
  • Grooming supplies; and
  • Office items.

Obviously, you can always donate money to a shelter; but there are other ways to help if you don’t have the extra money (especially at this time of year)! Extra items or those going unused at home could be very useful at a shelter. Again, call a shelter first to see what items they need and will accept.


I am in high hopes that this blog helps our animal shelters receive extra donations during this Season of Giving. Also, keep your local shelters in mind, not just over the holidays, but throughout the coming year!


A big thank you to all our animal shelters and may all the pets find forever homes!

 

Dog Bless~ 

 

 

 

Not sure where to find YOUR local shelters?

Just pull out your smartphone and google “animal shelters near me!” 

 

 


My Secret Dog BlogMeet our Guest Blogger

Holli Burch is a blogger at The Dog Connection focusing on Connecting Humans and Dogs; Mind, Body and Soul. She likes to focus everyday on giving back and uplifting dog lovers. You can follow Holli on Facebook.


 

If You Own a Dog, Are You Aware of this Suffocation Risk?

Image by Foto-Rabe from Pixabay

 

I thought I had heard it all when it comes to the trouble our dogs (and even cats) can get into. Well, I stand corrected, because recently I learned about a common danger that exists at this very moment in almost every household (probably including yours)!

I’m talking about empty snack bags that contain:

  • Chips
  • Pretzels
  • Crackers
  • Popcorn
  • Jerky
  • Cookies and MORE!

Click here to learn more at the Ken Caryl Pet Spa’s blog with this life-saving post: Yes, Your Nosy Dog Can Suffocate in an Empty Chip Bag!

And PLEASE, share it with a friend to protect other curious dogs, cats and pets!

YOU Can Make a Difference on Clear the Shelters Day!

 

Now in its fifth year, Clear the Shelters is fast-approaching this Saturday, August 17th! Since the campaign started in 2015, more than a quarter of a million homeless dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs and even birds have found their “fur-ever” homes!

 

Want to adopt your new best friend this year?

Find a Clear the Shelters participating

partner (by zip code) by clicking here.

 

 

Have a shelter or rescue organization and want to participate in this year’s Clear the Shelters campaign?

Click here to register now!

 

For questions or more ways you can help the 2019 Clear the Shelters event, contact your local participating shelter or rescue using this map!

Pitbull image by Beverly Lussier from Pixabay.

 

 

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