Category Archives: dog treats

RECALL: Icelandic Plus Dog & Cat Treats

 

Thankfully it’s been pretty quiet when it comes to product recalls for our beloved pets.

But on Monday, March 23rd, the FDA published a new recall for Whole Capelin Fish Pet Treats made by IcelandicPlus LLC of Fort Washington, PA. The recall was issued because some of the fish “exceeded the FDA compliance guidelines for fish larger than 5 inches.” While there have been no reports of illness as of the date of publication, Icelandic+ is cooperating with the recall because of a possible health risk. 

 

Icelandic+

The FDA has determined that salt-cured, dried, or fermented un-eviscerated fish larger than 5 inches have been linked to outbreaks of botulism poisoning in humans between 1981 and 1987 and again in 1991. 

Icelandic Plus says that as of March 23rd, “there have been no reported illnesses of dogs, cats or people in connection with the recalled product.” In addition, there are no positive test results for Clostridium botulinum (botulism poisoning) in connection with the Capelin product.

IcealandicPlus-Capelin-Whole-Fish-Pet-Treat-Recall.jpg

The recalled product comes in a:

  1. Clear plastic tube (2.5 ounces); or
  2. Clear plastic bag (1.5 or 2.5 ounces)

Both the tubes and packages are printed with either:

  • Icelandic+ Capelin WHOLE FISH, PURE FISH TREATS FOR DOGS; or
  • Icelandic+ Capelin PURE FISH TREATS FOR CATS.

The recalled UPC codes are:

  • 8 5485400775 9;
  • 8 5485400711 7; and
  • 8 5485400757 5.

The recalled lot numbers are 02/2020 to 02/2022.

The Entire USA is Included in the Recall

The recalled product was shipped to distributors for sale to independent retail pet specialty stores throughout the USA.

 

Botulism Poisoning: What You Need to Know

The botulism toxin can cause severe symptoms including death in both animals eating tainted products as well as people handling the contaminated product or coming in contact with exposed and tainted surfaces.

Common symptoms of botulism poisoning include:

  • Dizziness;
  • Blurred or double vision;
  • Trouble speaking, swallowing or breathing;
  • Muscle weakness;
  • Distended abdomen; and
  • Constipation.

Pets or people experiencing any of these symptoms should seek immediate medical help.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop feeding any of the recalled products and return it to the store where it was purchased for a refund.  Consumers may contact the company at 857-246-9559, Monday – Friday from 8am-5pm EST.

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

© 2020. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

Guest Blog: Ideas for Local Animal Shelters During the Holidays

Help Animal Shelters During Christmas

It’s December and the Season for Giving!

It’s also a wonderful time to think about our local animal shelters. 

 

For most of us, the holidays come with colder weather. As I write this, here in Wisconsin, it’s only 6 degrees! Sadly, this time of year also sees an increased number of dogs and cats in need of shelter. Since shelters usually operate from donations, whatever you can give goes a long way in helping homeless pets.

 

Ideas for Giving to Your Local Shelter

Give Love and Attention to Shelter Pets

Your Time – All dogs and cats need attention, cuddle time and exercise. Especially during the holidays, shelters and rescues are always looking for extra volunteers to help keep the animals feeling loved and well-cared for.

Food – Both canines and felines eat at least twice a day. That is a lot of food for a shelter! Depending on age and diet needs, they typically will accept a variety of quality foods both dry and wet along with treats. Other foods a shelter can typically use include peanut butter (please make sure it’s xylitol-free), fresh veggies and fruits, canned baby food and tuna. Call your local shelter first to see what they are currently accepting.

Spare Blankets, Pillows and Towels – Shelters can always use these items for their crates and bedding. They also need rags, newspapers and kitty litter.

Toys – Shelters can always use toys to help the dogs (and cats) stay happy, mentally stimulated and active. Kong toys, balls or puzzles are great, so are gently used stuffed animals! Do you have toys that your dog or cat refuses to play with? Donate them!Donate Crates and Carriers to Local Shelters

Crates and Carriers – Both dogs and cats love a secure den. Are you no longer using your dog crate or cat carrier? Donate it!  You can help a shelter animal feel safer, especially in a busy shelter where things may seem scary and overwhelming.

Other items you could give include:

  • Food and water bowls;
  • Grooming supplies; and
  • Office items.

Obviously, you can always donate money to a shelter; but there are other ways to help if you don’t have the extra money (especially at this time of year)! Extra items or those going unused at home could be very useful at a shelter. Again, call a shelter first to see what items they need and will accept.


I am in high hopes that this blog helps our animal shelters receive extra donations during this Season of Giving. Also, keep your local shelters in mind, not just over the holidays, but throughout the coming year!


A big thank you to all our animal shelters and may all the pets find forever homes!

 

Dog Bless~ 

 

 

 

Not sure where to find YOUR local shelters?

Just pull out your smartphone and google “animal shelters near me!” 

 

 


My Secret Dog BlogMeet our Guest Blogger

Holli Burch is a blogger at The Dog Connection focusing on Connecting Humans and Dogs; Mind, Body and Soul. She likes to focus everyday on giving back and uplifting dog lovers. You can follow Holli on Facebook.


 

RECALL: Texas Tripe Raw Pet Food

 

The USDA (US Food and Drug Administration) issues a recall alert on August 14th regarding 35 frozen lots of Texas Tripe Raw Pet Food (manufactured by Texas Tripe Inc).

The recall was issued after samples tested positive for Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes. Testing was done by the Office of the Texas State Chemist (OTSC). Of the 23 samples tested,  16 were positive.

The recalled products were sold frozen in 20- and 40-pound cases containing multiple plastic pouches in 23 product varieties. NOTE: There are no unique identifications numbers on the individual chubs (plastic pouches) to identify them as the recalled products. Lot codes are only printed on the outside of the cases.

Here is the list of all the recalled products and lot numbers:

(Courtesy: The Dog Advisor)

The States Included in the Recall

The recalled products were sold directly to consumers (online and over the phone) in the following states:

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

 

ALSO … A Special Note

The products below were also tested and showed positive for Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes but have NOT been recalled.

  • Texas Tripe Chicken Blend: Lot 19196-6
  • Texas Tripe Pork Blend: Lot 19190-09
  • Texas Tripe Beef Blend: Lot 19191-05

Pet treats and food contaminated with Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes pose a public health concern because they can affect both the health of animals and humans. Refrigeration or even freezing does not kill the bacteria.

 

What You Should Know About Salmonella

Salmonella poses a risk to animals ingesting the affected product (including dogs and cats) and humans. Pets infected with salmonella may display symptoms including:

  • Fever;
  • Lethargy and shock;
  • Diarrhea (which may last up to 3-4 weeks or longer);
  • Vomiting;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Dehydration; and
  • Mucus and/or blood in the stool.

People infected with salmonella can also have:

  • Diarrhea;
  • Fever; and
  • Abdominal cramps.

For some people, their diarrhea may be severe enough to require hospitalization.

 

What You Should Know About Listeria Monocytogenes

Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans (if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product). Pets infected with listeria may display symptoms including:

  • Mild to severe diarrhea;
  • Anorexia;
  • Fever;
  • Nervous, muscular and respiratory system issues;
  • Abortion;
  • Depression; and
  • Shock and even death.

Infected animals can also serve as sources of infection to other household animals and humans.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop feeding any of the recalled products and discard them in a secure container where stray animals or wildlife cannot access them.

Consumers should also:

  • Clean their refrigerator/freezers where the product was stored.
  • Thoroughly wash their hands after handling any recalled products.
  • Clean and disinfect any:
    • Utensils;
    • Bowls;
    • Surfaces including floors; and
    • Pet bedding and toys.

 

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

© 2019. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

RECALL: Bulk Pig Ears Recalled in 33 States

UPDATE: 

The CDC has expanded its investigation to 27 states regarding the outbreak of human Salmonella infections because of contaminated bulk pig ear dog treats.

According to the CDC website, as of July 16th, 93 people have been infected with one of 3 genetic strains of the salmonella bacteria found on the bulk pig ear dog treats (from 27 states) and twenty people have been hospitalized. The CDC labels these infections as “multidrug-resistant.” Since it takes 2-4 weeks for a person to become ill (with diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps) after handling a contaminated pig ear, not all illnesses may have yet been reported.

Those at the greatest risk include children under the age of 5, adults 65 years and older and those with weakened immune systems.

In addition, infected pets can carry and infect other animals and humans.

Source: Dog Food Advisor and CDC.gov.

 


 

Pet Supplies Plus has issued a recall to over 400 retail stores in 33 states for bulk pig ears (dog treats).

The recall only includes bulk pig ears stocked in open bins. Prepackaged branded pig ears are not included in this recall.

The recall was issued after testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development revealed the presence of Salmonella.

The States Included in the PSP Recall

Bulk Pig Ear Dog Treats are Being Recalled

The recall involves Pet Supplies Plus stores in:

Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

 

ALSO … An Investigation

On July 3rd, the FDA (together with the CDC) announced an investigation of contaminated pig ear dog treats that may be connected to human, drug-resistant Salmonella infections that have sickened 45 people in 13 states with 12 patients hospitalized from coming into contact with the contaminated pig ears.

The recall may or may not be related.

 

What You Should Know About Salmonella

Salmonella poses a risk to animals ingesting the affected product (including dogs and cats) and humans. Pets infected with salmonella may display symptoms including:

  • Fever;
  • Lethargy and shock;
  • Diarrhea (which may last up to 3-4 weeks or longer);
  • Vomiting;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Dehydration; and
  • Mucus and/or blood in the stool.

People infected with salmonella can also have:

  • Diarrhea;
  • Fever; and
  • Abdominal cramps.

For some people, their diarrhea may be severe enough to require hospitalization.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop feeding any recalled pig ears and discard them in a secure container where stray animals or wildlife cannot access them. Consumers who have further questions are welcome to contact Pet Supplies Plus Neighbor Service team at 734-793-6564 between Monday and Friday 9 am to 4 pm ET (excluding holidays).

 

Pet Supplies Plus Recalls Pig Ears Dog Treats in 33 States

FDA Investigates Contaminated Pig Ear Pet Treats Connected to Human Salmonella Infections

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

© 2019. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

Turmeric: The Golden Healer for Dogs

Turmeric: The Spice Your Dog Needs

Dog owners, do you recognize (and better yet, use) this powerful, all-natural spice to support your K9’s best health?


This “golden spice” (from India and Southeast Asia) offers a wealth of health benefits for your beloved canineTurmeric can help your aging dog companion usually without side effects.

Does your dog suffer from:

  • Arthritis?
  • Cancer?
  • Pain?
  • Allergies?
  • Chronic Inflammation?
  • Kidney, Dental or Digestive Issues?

 

If your dog suffers from any of these health challenges,

click here to learn about the 5 benefits of turmeric for dogs

without harmful side effects from our friends at Dogs Love Kale.

(P.S. This information could also help YOU!)

 


 

RECALLS: A Look at 10 Years of Pet Food Recalls

An in-depth look by Susan Thixton of TruthAboutPetFood.com at the past ten years of Pet Food and Treat recalls and what we can learn.

A Decade of Recalls

During the past ten years (January 1, 2009 to November 4, 2018) did you know there’s been 173 pet food recalls posted on the FDA website?

BUT wait; that’s NOT the whole story!

Those 173 recalls represents the number of recall Press Releases issued, NOT the total number of actual pet foods recalled. In addition, some recalls count as “one” recall even though multiple products may actually be involved in the “one” recall.

The Recalls: What’s Actually Included?

The recalls over the past ten years have included the following categories:

  • 59 Treat Recalls
  • 48 Raw Recalls
  • 45 Kibble Recalls
  • 17 Canned Recalls
  • 3 Dehydrated Recalls
  • 1 Cooked, Sold Frozen Pet Food

What Should YOU do Next?

Education is the best defense in keeping your pets safe and healthy.

Learn more about the last decade of recalls at TruthAboutPetFood.com.  Learn about the specific causes for the recalls and which ones pose the greatest risk for your pet. (Hint: Salmonella, Listeria and E.coli rank at #1.)

Did you know that some causes behind the recalls even pose health risks to YOU, the pet owner?! (Including infants and children 5 years and younger; adults aged 65 and older; AND people with weakened immune systems.)

Your Dog Depends On You To Protect Him!Your Cat Depends on You To Protect Her!

 

Remember, your pet is depending on you to be his advocate and educated consumer!

What you don’t know can hurt your beloved pet!

 

 

(Again, we thank Susan Thixton for this in-depth expose about what we can learn from the past ten years of Pet Food and Treat recalls.)

 

Source: Truth About Pet Food.

Antler Chews: Are They Safe for Your Dog?

Should you give your dog antlers to chew?
Are antlers a safer option to other chews on the market?
Are all antlers the same?
How are antlers “graded” and what does it mean?

Dogs are natural chewers. Whether it’s a puppy exploring his new world through his mouth, or adult dogs chewing to release pent-up energy and/or stress, most dogs enjoy this instinctive behavior.

While almost anything is better than your K9 destroying your expensive leather shoes or couch to indulge their need to chew, are all chew treats created equal (and safe)?

Are all Chews Created Equal?

After the shocking revelation in 2007 about the toxic, Chinese-made dog treats sickening and even killing pets (dogs and cats); dog owners everywhere became more concerned and vigilant about the treats they were offering to their dogs.

When even more information came out about all the potentially deadly chemicals used to mass-produce rawhide in China, “safe” choices became even further limited for canine guardians. (Not to mention numerous horror studies about rawhide pieces becoming stuck or causing obstructions requiring surgery to save a dog.) Click here to learn the harmful truth behind making rawhide.

Are Antlers a Safer Option?

So, what about something more “natural,” like antlers from wild deer or elk?

Like most subjects about dog health, “expert” opinions about whether antlers are a completely safe chewing option falls between both ends of the spectrum. From slick marketing campaigns raving about the wonders of antlers for your dog’s chewing pleasure to so-called dog experts decrying even the thought of offering an antler to your dog to chew. While the controversy rages on, educate yourself on the pros and cons of antler chews for your dog.

Factors to Consider

Deciding whether an antler chew is good (or not) for your dog involves a number of factors, including:

  • What kind of chewer your dog is;
  • Your dog’s current dental health;
  • The “grade” of antler you are planning to give your dog to chew; and
  • The supplier/distributor of the antler chews and whether they sell cheaper, low-grade or inferior products.

When you know better, you can make better choices for what to safely offer your dog to chew. Knowing your own dog is the first place to start. Is your dog a heavy or aggressive chewer? The chewing needs or habits are vastly different for a Chihuahua versus a Rottweiler. Smaller teeth and jaws cannot stand up to extremely hard objects like antlers.

Also, consider your dog’s current dental health. Have they suffered from dental issues that would rule out giving them hard items to chew?

Not sure if your dog’s teeth are healthy? Click here to learn more.

If you have determined your dog’s dental health and chewing needs can tolerate hard chewing, keep reading to learn more about antler chews.

What IS an Antler?

Antlers come from moose, caribou, elk, reindeer and deer. Typically, elk antlers are the easiest ones to find.

It’s also believed that antlers do not splinter or chip as easily as some other bones or toys. While antlers may seem similar to “horns” … they are actually different. Cow horns are made from a substance call keratin; similar to our nails and hair. They also have a lining of bone inside them.

Antlers, on the other hand, are made from real bone and cartilage with a marrow core. They are actually a bony outgrowth of the animal’s skull. Since they are actual bone, they are also very hard. Antlers are typically shed each year allowing a new set to grow in their place. Antlers (unlike processed bones or rawhides) also offer nutritional value in the form of:

  • Calcium
  • Protein
  • Chondroitin Sulfate
  • Glucosamine
  • Collagen
  • Magnesium
  • Iron and Zinc

For dogs fed a raw diet, bones are important to their diet. But, it is not necessary for them to eat very hard bones (like antlers or weight-bearing leg bones).

Grading Antlers: What it all Means

Antlers are “graded” on five different levels. Before you buy any kind of antler for your dog to chew, below is what you need to know first.

Grade A+ Antlers

These are the highest quality and most pristine antlers, previously reserved for high-end craft and artisan use. They constitute less than 5% of all antlers each year. Only a few stores and distributors are focused on selling antlers of this caliber.

Grade A Antlers

These antlers comprise the top 10-15% of all antlers each year. They have been shed during the current – or previous – year. These antlers will appear a little more on the light-brown side; as they have been freshly shed and have had only minimal exposure to the elements.

Grade B Antlers

This grade of antler comprises the bulk of all antlers sold online by the “high-end” brands. These antlers are easily recognized as they will be white from sun bleaching which also means they are dried out. They may also show visible marks of rodent chewing. These antlers are approximately one to two years old. While they may be sold by well-established brands, it does not mean they are “safe dog chews.” While they are not the worst of the antlers, they are definitely not the safest for your dog based on their age and being dried out which means they could splinter or chip much more easily.

Grades C and D

The final two grades are combined together because, for all intents and purposes, these antlers are “junk” and definitely not safe for your dog. These antlers are not only white from years in the sun and exposure to the elements; but there is also a white powder that can be easily scraped off the surface. In addition, the antler has almost a coral-like porous crystalline structure to it, due to having lost too much moisture. This makes it even more susceptible to breaking, splintering or chipping even with minimal effort. These antlers are commonly sold in the big-box pet stores and outdoor sports stores.

A Few Final Cautions

  • Make sure any antler product you buy and give to your dog is sourced from the USA (preferably from organically raised animals). Note: China does chemically process and ship antlers to the United States.
  • Also, make sure you buy the right size antler for your dog (one that cannot be easily swallowed).
  • Do not give puppies any kind of antlers to chew on. (The high protein content can cause stomach upset and diarrhea.)
  • And finally, if you do decide to give your dog an antler chew (or any other chew as well), always supervise them to keep them safe! No chew product is 100% safe and healthy for every dog. Digestive or dental issues, possible choking (in the mouth or throat) and intestinal obstructions are always a risk.
  • Check with your veterinarian first before giving your dog any chew product.

 


Additional Resources:

The Perils of Gum Disease in Dogs

Dogs Love These Chews, But They Fracture Teeth Like Crazy

Are Deer Antlers Safe for Dogs to Chew On?

Antlers for Dogs: Are Deer Antlers Safe for Dogs to Chew On?

Are Antlers Safe for Dogs?

Deer Antlers as a Chew Toy for Dogs

Are Deer Antlers for Dogs a Good Chew Toy?


© 2018. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may not be reproduced, displayed or published without prior written permission of Cold Noses News. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

RECALL: Merrick Beef Dog Treats

Merrick Pet Care (Amarillo, TX) has issued a voluntary recall of five production codes of their beef treat products. The recalled products include: Prime Patties Real Beef Recipe, Sausage Cuts Real Beef Recipe, Real Beef Jerky, Real Beef Sausage Cuts and Real Steak Patties.

Why the Recall

The recall was initiated by Merrick after the FDA shared a consumer complaint of their dog’s health being temporarily impacted after eating Merrick Backcountry Great Plains Real Beef Jerky, 4.5 oz. The dog fully recovered after the treat was no longer fed.

According to a press release from Merrick, “we have not received any similar reports to date from consumers about issues with these products.”

These treats are distributed in the United States through pet speciality, grocery and online retailers with limited distribution in Canada.

The limited recall includes only the production codes listed below (production codes are listed on the lower back of treat bags):

What You Should Know About Beef Thyroid

Elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone (which occurs naturally), may cause the following symptoms in dogs:

  • Increased Thirst & Urination;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Increased Heart Rate; and
  • Restlessness.

If high levels are consumed over an extended period of time, symptoms may increase in severity and include vomiting, diarrhea and rapid or labored breathing. If your dog has consumed any of these recalled products and is showing the symptoms listed above, immediately discontinue feeding the treat and contact your vet.

What to do Next

Consumers with any of the recalled products may receive a refund by:

 

Source: Merrick Pet Care Beef Dog Treats Recall

RECALLS: The Dog Food Recalls Continue …

Recent recalls include products made by:

  • K9 Natural
  • Vital Essentials
  • OC Raw Dog

Below are the latest recalls since our last blog post.

 


K9 Natural Ltd

On April 13th, K9 Natural Ltd of New Zealand voluntarily recalled four batches of its K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast (the 2.2 and 11lb bags) that were imported to the United States in June 2017. The recall was issued due to potential Listeria monocytogenes.

The recall involves:

K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast (2.2 lb bags):

Shipped to distributors/pet speciality retail stores in WA, CA, TX and CO with the batch #170517 and an expiration date of 17NOV2018.

K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast (11 lb bags):

Shipped to distributors/pet speciality retail stores in WA, CA, TX, CO and PA with the following batch numbers:

  • #150517 (expiration date of 15NOV2018)
  • #160517 (expiration date of 16NOV2018)
  • #170517 (expiration date of 17NOV2018)

There have been no reports of illness.

Customers with questions may contact the company via phone at 1 888 345 4680, M-F 8am-5pm PST & EST and S-S 14 &15 April 2018 8am-5pm PST & EST or email info@k9natural.com.

Click here to learn more about the K9 Natural recall.

 


 

Vital Essentials

For the third time,  another recall was issued on two Vital Essentials products: Vital Essentials Freeze-Dried Beef Toppers and Vital Essentials Frozen Beef Chub Entree for Dogs due to potential Salmonella contamination.

Salmonella can infect both dogs, cats and humans.

The recalled products can be identified with the following information:

 

Vital Essentials Freeze-Dried Beef Toppers: Lot #13815, Best by 06/04/19

Vital Essentials Frozen Beef Chub Entrée: 5 lb., Lot #13816, Best by 12/27/18

Customers may notify their retailer for a replacement or refund or contact the company at 920-370-6542.

Click here to learn more about the Vital Essentials recall.


OC Raw Dog

OC Raw Dog of Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, issued a voluntary recall of approximately 1,560 lbs of their Chicken, Fish & Produce Raw Frozen Canine Formulation due to potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

The affected products were manufactured on October 11, 2017 with a Lot number of 3652 and a Use By Date of October 11, 2018.

The recalled Lot #3652 was shipped and sold to Independent Speciality Retailers in the following states: CA, CO, FL, MD, MN, PA and VT.

Click here to read more about the OC Raw Dog recall. 

NOTE: Another recall was also issued by OC Raw Dog for its Freeze-dried Sardines because the product exceeded FDA size restrictions (of 5 inches). (The FDA has determined that salt-cured, dried or fermented un-eviscerated fish larger than 5 inches have been linked to outbreaks of botulism poisoning between 1981 and 1987 and then again in 1991.)

Click here to read more about the OC Raw Dog recall for Freeze-dried Sardines. 

 


 

We try our best to keep our readers informed with the latest recall information (here on our blog and on our Twitter/Facebook pages); unfortunately that’s not always possible. To stay informed with the latest recalls, subscribe to one (we recommend all) of the recall alerts below.

Your pet is counting on you.

Dog Food Advisor

Truth About Pet Food 

American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMA)

US Food & Drug Administration (FDA)

RECALLS: What You MUST Know

(Note: We’ve been trying to publish this post since February. But with the constant barrage of recalls, it’s been almost impossible to stay up-to-date with all the information.)

The last few months have been nothing short of frightening when it comes to recalls and our beloved pets. Unfortunately, we’ve all become a bit immune to seeing recall announcements here and there. But as the few months have clearly shown, recalls are on the rise particularly with the bacterial contamination of Salmonella which can infect dogs, cats and humans.

 

Recent recalls include products made by:

  • J.M. Smucker Company: Gravy Train, Kibbles ‘N Bits, Ol’ Roy & Skippy
  • Northwest Naturals
  • Vital Essentials
  • TruPet
  • Smokehouse Pet Products
  • Redbarn Pet Products
  • Raws for Paws
  • Darwin’s Natural Pet Products
  • Blue Ridge Beef
  • J.M. Smucker Company: Milo’s Kitchen Dog Treats
  • Blue Buffalo Company
  • Radagast Pet Food
  • Steve’s Real Food
  • Raw Basics
  • An Update on the Deadly Chinese Jerky Treats

 

Keep reading to learn more about each recall.


J.M. Smucker (Dogs & Cats)

In early February, traces of pentobarbital (a drug used to euthanize cats, dogs and horses) were found in Gravy Train canned dog food. The findings came out of an  ABC station’s investigation (WJLA in Washington, DC). The investigation found pentobarbital in 9 out of 15 cans (or 60%) of Gravy Train dog food. Over months of testing and re-testing, WJLA News tested a total of 62 samples of dog food.

Sourcing meat for pet food from a “diseased animal or an animal that has died otherwise than by slaughter” is a direct violation of federal law (Section 342(a)).

The Smucker Company (Orrvile, OH) later expanded the recall to include certain lots of Gravy Train, Kibbles ‘N Bits, Ol’ Roy and Skippy wet dog food products.

 Click here to learn more about the original recall and the affected SKUs/UPC codes.

(UPDATE: A day after the story broke on February 8th, a class action lawsuit was filed against Big Heart Brands Gravy Train for advertising, misrepresenting and selling contaminated dog foods.)

(NOTE: J.M. Smucker also recalled certain lots of canned cat food in January. Click here to learn more about this limited voluntary recall.)


Northwest Naturals

Near the end of February, Northwest Naturals of Portland Oregon, issued a recall for its 5lb frozen Chicken and Salmon pet food chubs (sealed plastic tubes) due to potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

While no pet or human illnesses were reported, Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product.

Click here to learn more about this recall.

 


Vital Essentials

Again at the end of February, Carnivore Meat Company of Green Bay, WI, recalled 73 cases of Vital Essentials Freeze-Dried Beef Nibblets Entree for Dogs pet food due to potential Salmonella contamination.

The affected product was distributed through both independent and online retailers, Chewys.com and Amazon.com. Salmonella can infect both dogs, cats and humans. The contamination was found following the Michigan Department of Agriculture’s collection of a single batch, retail sample that tested positive. There have been no reports of illness.

Click here to learn more about the Vital Essentials recall.

 


 

TruPet

Another recall during the last week of February included a limited recall from TruPet of Milford, OH, for their “Treat Me Crunchy Beef Delight” 2.5 oz pet treats due to possible Salmonella contamination.

Click here to learn more about the TruPet/TruDog treat recall.

 

 


Smokehouse Pet Products

 

On February 19th, the FDA announced a recall of Beefy Munchies dog treats by Smokehouse Pet Products of Sun Valley, CA.  The recall included all sizes and package types (including individual bags, resealable bags and plastic tubs (labeled “Beefy Bites”) due to possible Salmonella contamination.

The recall was issued after routine sampling and testing by the Colorado Department of Agriculture revealed Salmonella in two 4-oz packages.

Click here to read more about the Smokehouse Pet Products Beefy Munchies recall. 

 


Redbarn Pet Products

In early March, Redbarn Pet Products of Long Beach, CA, expanded its original recall (of February 9th) to include all lots of their Bully Sticks under the brand names of Chewy Louie, Dentley’s and Good Lovin’.

The presence of Salmonella was revealed through testing by the Colorado Department of Agriculture. The investigation led to a raw ingredient from a single supplier as the source. The affected products were distributed in pet speciality and grocery retail stores nationwide.

Click here to learn more about the recall and click here to view all 25 recalled products and their images.

 


Raws for Paws

In early February, approximately 4,000 pounds of Ground Turkey Pet food were recalled by Raws for Paws of Minneapolis, MN because of the potential presence of Salmonella.

Both the 1- and 5-pound chubs (sealed plastic tubes) were including in the recall. The affected product was distributed throughout Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and through online mail orders.

Two illnesses were reported in connection with this recall. The recall was issued after testing by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture returned positive results.

Click here to learn more about the Raws for Paws recall of Ground Turkey Pet Food. 

 


Darwin’s Natural Pet Products

Another early February recall involved two Darwin’s Pet Food products (of Tukwila WA):

  • ZooLogics Chicken Meals with Organic Vegetables for Dogs; and
  • ZooLogics Turkey with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs.

Testing revealed the presence of Salmonella. According to Gary Tashjian, the Founder of Darwin’s Pet Products, customers who received these meals were notified directly. Darwin’s Natural Pet Products are sold exclusively through a subscription service directly to their customers.

Just a few days ago, the recall was expanded to include a total of four lots of products. The following products were also added to the recall with the potential of Salmonella and E. Coli (0128):

  • Natural Selections Chicken with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs; and
  • Natural Selections Duck with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs.

Click here to learn more about the expanded recall of Darwin’s Pet Food products.

 


Blue Ridge Beef (Dogs & Kittens)

Front Chub package BRB Complete; Back of Chub package with Nutrition InformationAgain, just a few days ago, another recall was issued, this time for Blue Ridge Beef (BRB) of Eatonton, GA. The recall involves one lot of its BRB Complete Raw pet food because of the potential presence of both Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. The affected product is sold in 2-pound chubs (sealed plastic tubes) and are frozen. The recall only affects the following states:

  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • North and South Carolina
  • Tennessee

The contamination was revealed after samples were collected and tested by the FDA.

To learn more about the Blue Ridge Beef recall, click here.

NOTE: On March 2nd, Blue Ridge Beef also issued a recall for one lot of their Kitten Grind Raw Pet Food again for the potential contamination of both Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Click here to learn more about this recall.

 


J.M. Smucker Company (Milo’s Kitchen Dog Treats)

Just a few days again, the J.M. Smucker Company issued another recall for two specific lots of Milo’s Kitchen dog treats. The treats potentially contain elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone. Dogs ingesting elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone may exhibit symptoms like increased thirst and urination, weight loss, increased heart rate and restlessness. While these symptoms may resolve themselves once the affected product is no longer fed, prolonged consumption can result in serious vomiting, diarrhea and rapid and/or labored breathing. 

Click here to learn more about the recall and the affected UPC codes.

 


Blue Buffalo Company

Earlier this month, Blue Buffalo (Wilton, CT) issued a recall of one lot of its BLUE Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs because of the possibility of elevated levels of beef thyroid hormones.

Dogs ingesting elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone may exhibit symptoms like increased thirst and urination, weight loss, increased heart rate and restlessness. While these symptoms may resolve themselves once the affected product is no longer fed, prolonged consumption can result in serious vomiting, diarrhea and rapid and/or labored breathing. 

NOTE: Blue Buffalo Pet Food was recently purchased by General Mills (the makers of Cheerios, Haagen-Dazs, Betty Crocker, Pillsbury and Old El Paso.

Click here to read more about the Blue Buffalo recall. 

 


Radagast Pet Food (Cats)

UPDATE: Radagast Pet is expanding their original recall to all varieties of Rad Cat Raw Diet due to potential listeria contamination.

Click here to learn more about the latest, expanded recall and the affected lot numbers.

The Portland, OR company, Radagast Pet Food, Inc., is recalling two lots of their products as of March 20th due to the potential of Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

The two recipes being recalled include:

  • Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Chicken; and
  • Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Turkey.

Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product.

Click here to learn more about the Radagast Cat Food recall and the two lots affected.

 


Steve’s Real Food

Earlier this month, Steve’s Real Food (Cottonwood, UT) issued a recall for its Raw Frozen Dog Food Turkey Canine Recipe after testing positive for Salmonella.

The affected lot (52 cases) involved their frozen 5-pound bags of turkey nuggets. They were distributed to retail pet food stores in the following states:

 

 

  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Florida
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • North Dakota
  • Nebraska
  • New Jersey
  • Nevada
  • New York
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • Washington

To learn more about the Steve’s Real Food recall, click here.


Raw Basics

Another frozen raw pet food issued a recall on March 6th. Raw Basics of Pleasant Prairie, WI, recalled its 5-pound boxes of Tucker’s Raw Frozen Pork-Bison Dog Food for potential Salmonella contamination.

The presence of Salmonella was revealed after testing done by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture. The contamination was isolated to one lot of 108 boxes (540 pounds) and distributed to pet specialty retail stores in Minnesota, Georgia, Kansas and Pennsylvania.

Click here to learn more about the Raw Basics recall.

 


An Update on the Deadly Chinese Jerky Treats

It’s happened again, this time in Oklahoma with a 4-year-old Yorkie.

Within hours of eating of chicken jerky dog treats with “all natural farm fresh ingredients” sourced from China, Zoe was dead.

It’s been over 11 years since imported food and treats from China have been harming – and even killing – our pets. Yet the treats still sit on store shelves for unsuspecting customers to buy and feed to their pets.

If you thought someone is looking out and protecting both you and your beloved pets, think again. If you’re looking for obvious information and disclosures about the treats you buy, think again too.

Read ALL the print, especially the tiny print buried on the back of the package (as illustrated below with the treats that killed Zoe, sold at Walmart).

With no answers from the FDA’s years-long investigative research, but with pets still being sickened and dying, become your own best advocate and learn all you can about what you feed your pet. Until safety takes precedent over profits, your pet’s health is in potential danger.

Click here to read more about unsafe Chinese jerky treats.

Click here to read Zoe’s story.

 


 

We try our best to keep our readers informed with the latest recall information (here on our blog and on our Twitter/Facebook pages); unfortunately that’s not always possible. To stay informed with the latest recalls, subscribe to one (we recommend all) of the recall alerts below.

Your pet is counting on you.

Dog Food Advisor

Truth About Pet Food 

American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMA)

US Food & Drug Administration (FDA)

RECALL: Just Food for Dogs

Just Food for Dogs has issued their first-ever recall after a report from a customer of vomiting and diarrhea after her dogs ate their Turducken product.

In a detailed email from Founder, Shawn Buckley, it was confirmed that one batch of Turducken special (made in their West Hollywood kitchen and code dated: WH 11/18/18) did test positive for Listeria. The dogs who were affected were switched to another food and made a full recovery, without veterinarian intervention, within a day.

Why the Recall

The returned Turducken food was tested and subsequently confirmed the presence of Listeria. The source of the contamination has been traced to the human-grade green beans used in the Turducken recipe.

Based on these preliminary results, Just Food for Dogs is voluntarily:

  • Expanding the Turducken recall to all batch dates.
  • Recalling two other recipes containing green beans:
    • Beef & Russet Potato; and
    • Fish & Sweet Potato.
  • Notifying the FDA as the contaminated green beans may also affect the human food supply.

Severe disease from Listeria in dogs is rare. In fact, Listeria is of more concern to humans. Healthy dogs may experience no signs from listeria contamination, but elderly or weakened dogs may experience vomiting and/or diarrhea.

What to do Next

Consumers are urged to properly dispose of any affected product.

Consumers may also email (support@JustFoodForDogs.com) or call (866-726-9509) Just Food for Dogs for an immediate refund. Shawn Buckley can be reached directly at shawnb@JustFoodForDogs.com or 949-378-2927.

 

Source: Truth About Pet Food: Just Food for Dogs Pet Food Recall.

Please Help Us Help Others.

The holidays are a wonderful time for most of us. Families come together and create new, happy memories, eat lots of wonderful food and eagerly open presents.

But for many people, the winter season can be a difficult time trying to stay warm and still have enough food to eat for not only themselves and their children, but also for their furry family members.

Please support your local pantries to help those in need. The simpliest things can mean the most to those who need help. And let us know about the pet pantries in your area so we can add them to our website to help even more people this holiday season.

Email us directly at Bobbie@ColdNosesNews.com, click on the images to email us or leave a message below.

Thank you and Happy Holidays everyone!

Help! My Pet Just Ate Something Bad for Them!

We’re SO excited to be a Featured Blogger on Grandma Lucy’s blog especially in time for Halloween!

Go check out our guest blog and learn:

  • What foods are bad (not “dog-friendly) for your dog.
  • The symptoms your dog ate something bad.
  • What to do if your dog begins exhibiting these symptoms.

 


Thank YOU Grandma Lucy’s for helping to keep our pets safe!


 

RECALL: Loving Pets Air-Puffed Dog Treats

Loving Pets, a New Jersey-based manufacturer of pet treats located in Cranbury, is voluntarily recalling a limited number of dog treats for potential salmonella contamination.

The limited recall includes the following products:

  • Loving Pets Barksters: Sweet Potato and Chicken and Brown Rice and Chicken;
  • Loving Pets Puffsters Snack Chips: Apple and Chicken, Banana and Chicken, Sweet Potato and Chicken and Cranberry and Chicken;
  • Whole Hearted: Chicken and Apple Puff Treats.

(For the specific Item, UPC and Lot numbers of the affected products, click here to go to the Loving Pets Products website.)

Salmonella and the Risks

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is also a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having come into contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. Symptoms of possible salmonella poisoning in humans include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. While rare, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Pets poisoned with Salmonella may exhibit lethargy, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may only show signs of decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers of salmonella and infect other animals or humans.

Contact your vet or doctor if you suspect salmonella poisoning for immediate help.

Why the Recall

The potential salmonella contamination was “discovered by the Loving Pet’s internal quality assurance team.”  The contamination was identified to a single finished ingredient supplied to Loving Pets from one of its USA-based suppliers.

According to a Press Release:

“Loving Pets produces its treats in small batches, in order to offer the highest quality and control in safety. To ensure the safety of its products, Loving Pets decided to be extra cautious and recall a wider range of lot numbers so that no possible contaminated product is available on the market.”

According to the Company’s website, no illnesses, injuries or complaints have been reported.

What to do Next

Consumers may return any affected treats to the retailer where the product was originally purchased.

For additional information, consumers may also call Cathy Vesey at 866-599-PETS (7387) or visit LovingPetsProducts.com.


To learn more about the Loving Pets recall, go to:

RECALL: Rawhide Chews: Multiple Brands

Still feeding your dog rawhide chews? Then this recall is for you.

United Pet Group, a division of Spectrum Brands, Inc., is voluntarily recalling multiple brands of packages of rawhide dog chew products (distributed to retail outlets and sold online in the U.S. from their Edwardsville, IL distribution center ) for potential chemical contamination.

All of the recalled dog rawhide chew products have an expiration date ranging from 06/01/2019 through 05/31/2020.

Why the Recall

United Pet Group identified manufacturing facilities (in Mexico and Colombia, as well as a Brazilian supplier), were using a processing aid during manufacturing (a quaternary ammonium compound). While this anti-microbial chemical compound is approved for cleaning food processing equipment, it has not been approved in the U.S. as a processing aid in the manufacturing of rawhide chews for dogs.

There have been very limited reports of pet illness and the primary consumer complaint was the unpleasant smell of affected products. Diarrhea and vomiting were also reported.

Exposure to quaternary ammonium compounds (through direct ingestion) may cause the following symptoms in dogs (depending on the severity, veterinarian treatment may be necesssary):

  • Reduced appetite, and
  • Gastric irritation (including diarrhea and vomiting).

What to do Next

Consumers are urged to properly dispose of any affected product or return it directly to United Pet Group or the retail store for a full refund.

Consumers may also contact the United Pet Group Consumer Affairs Team directly at 855-215-4962 between the hours of 8:00 AM – 11:00 PM Eastern Standard Time with questions or for a refund.

To learn more about the specific brand and product names and associated UPCs involved in this recall, go to:

RECALL: SmallBatch Pets Frozen Pet Food

Smallbatch Pets Inc., of Portland, Oregon, is recalling two specific lots of its frozen bags of 2lb Chicken Blend (for dogs and cats) due to finding salmonella.

The affected products were distributed to retail pet food stores in CA, CO, OR and WA and were sold between February 1st until May 5th, 2017.

The affected lots include:

  • Lot D032
  • UPC: 705105970974
  • Best By Date: 2/1/2018

and:

  • Lot E058
  • UPC: 705105970974
  • Best By Date: 2/27/2018

Salmonella and the Risks

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is also a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having come into contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. Symptoms of possible salmonella poisoning in humans include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. While rare, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Pets poisoned with Salmonella may exhibit lethargy, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may only show signs of decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers of salmonella and infect other animals or humans.

Contact your vet or doctor if you suspect salmonella poisoning for immediate help.

Why the Recall

According to a statement from Michael Vogel of Smallbatch Pets:

“The FDA (under the direction of the CVM) called us and they want us to recall two lots due to finding salmonella. No reported illness to dogs, cats or humans.”

What to do Next

Consumers with these products may return the affected product to the place of purchase for a full refund or contact the company by calling 888-507-2712 or by email at info@SmallBatchPets.com.

To learn more about this recall, go to:

RECALL: Cocolicious Canned Dog Food

Party Animal, Inc., of West Hollywood, CA, is recalling specific lots of two varieties of its Cocolicious Canned Dog Foods because each tested positive for pentobarbital.

Pentobarbital is a drug used to euthanize animals.

The following products are affected by this recall and the company has identified these products were manufactured and distributed in 2015:

  • Cocolicious Beef and Turkey
  • Size: 12 ounce cans
    Lot Number: 0136E15204 04
    Best By Date: July 2019
  • Cocolicious Chicken and Beef
  • Size: 12 ounce cans
    Lot Number: 0134E15 237 13
    Best By Date: August 2019

Why the Recall

According to a statement by Party Animal Pet Foods on their Facebook page:

“On April 13, a retailer in Texas notified us that their customer had presented samples of our Cocolicious Beef and Turkey Lot #0136E15204 04 and Cocolicious Chicken and Beef Lot #0134E15 237 13 to a testing lab (at Texas A&M ), and that the results had tested positive for pentobarbital.”

What to do Next

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 855-727-8926 or by email at info@partyanimalpetfood.com.

To learn more about this recall, go to:

RECALL: Pig Ears for Potential Salmonella

EuroCan Manufacturing of Ontario, Canada, is voluntarily recalling one lot of its Barnsdale Farms® Pig Ears due to the potential presence of Salmonella contamination.

The products were packaged as individually shrink-wrapped packages in quantities of 6, 12 and 25 under the following brands:

  • Barnsdale Farms®
  • Barnsdale Farms Select®
  • Houndstooth®
  • Mac’s Choice®

The recalled products are all from one Lot (#84) and were distributed throughout the United States and Canada.

Salmonella and the Risks

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is also a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having come into contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. Symptoms of possible salmonella poisoning in humans include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. While rare, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Pets poisoned with Salmonella may exhibit lethargy, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may only show signs of decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers of salmonella and infect other animals or humans.

Contact your vet or doctor if you suspect salmonella poisoning for immediate help.

Why the Recalls

While there have been no reports of illness, the company suspended distribution of the affected products while they, along with the FDA, continue to investigate the source of the problem.  Routine testing revealed the presence of Salmonella in the recalled products.

What to do Next

Consumers who purchased any of the recalled pig ear products (Barnsdale Farms®, HoundsTooth® and Mac’s Choice®), should return them to the place of purchase for a refund. Consumers with questions should contact the Company directly at 888-290-7606 (Monday-Friday, from 9am – 5pm EST).

To learn more about this recall and to see images of the recalled products, go to:

A Yummy, Gummy Paw Treat

gummypawsrecipe

If you’re an avid dog-lover like us (and we’re guessing you are … you are reading this blog after all), you want to do the very best for your canine family member especially with their food and treats.

So, when we saw this yummy, gummy paw treat recipe on PuppyDogPro, we just had to share (because sharing IS caring)!  With just TWO ingredients (what’s NOT to love about that?!), this simple, easy and healthy treat is a dream come true … for YOU and your dog!

Bone appetit!

Gummy Paw Treats

1 cup chicken stock (or beef stock if you prefer)

2 tablespoons or packets of unflavored gelatin

  • In a small pot, bring the stock to a boil.
  • Remove the pot from heat and let it cool for 3 minutes.
  • Whisk in gelatin until no clumps remain.
  • Let the liquid cool off for a few minutes and pour into molds or ice cube trays.
  • Refrigerate for several hours until set. (You could also put them in the freezer for about 90 minutes to speed up the process. If you do freeze them, let them thaw before offering to your dog in order to not damage his teeth. )
  • Serve treats when they are solid, but jiggly (like Jello).

Store treats in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Want them to last longer? You can freeze them for a couple of months.

(Source: PuppyDogPro: Chicken Gummy Paws Dog Treat Recipe)

Dr. Oz to Talk About Pet Food

Dr. Oz Logo

This is some great news to see this addressed in the mainstream media!

This  coming Thursday, September 22nd, the Dr. Oz Show will host a segment entitled, “What’s Really in Your Pet Food and Does It Matter?”

 

Thanks TruthAboutPetFood.com for spreading the word (http://tinyurl.com/jhfmrcr)!

Dog-lovers: Inquiring Minds Want to Know!

At Cold Noses News, we are always working our paws to the bone to figure out how to best Happy-Dog-Pictureserve you, our readers!

So here’s our question: if our K9-exclusive newsletter was offered to you, the dog-lover (not just to business owners), would you be willing to pay a small fee to receive it each month in your inbox? And … what if we told you that each month, in addition to the useful content, there would ALSO be a valuable coupon that would more than cover the monthly cost?

Let us know your opinion in the poll below!

Click here to see our latest issue for August.

Mark Your Calendar: FREE + DOGS this Sunday!

dog-1020790_1280Ok, I can’t deny it, besides my beloved Great Danes, my other favorite-ist thing is … FREE!

So, this Sunday (July 17th), join me in combining FREE + DOGS with PetSmart’s FREE Doggie Ice Cream Sundaes Giveaway!

Dog-safe, vanilla soft serve with dog biscuits sprinkled on top; for FREE!

Is there ANYTHING better?

At all PetSmart and PetsHotel locations this coming Sunday.

Ear Mites, Water Safety and Planning for Your Dog’s Care

July-2016-BannerThe July issue of our K9-exclusive newsletter will be out next week!

In this issue, we’re going to continue talking about how to effectively protect your K9 companion and give them the best possible life.  Topics will include summer and water safety, ear mites and how to plan for your dog’s care after you’re gone.

And of course, a tasty, healthy treat recipe!


Style: "Neutral"Own a dog business or service and not yet using print in your marketing strategy? Our unique and low-cost newsletter is a simple way of making clients feel “catered-to” and “looked-after” with the information they need to make the best, informed decisions for their K9 fur-kids.

And, there’s no quicker way to build trust and brand loyalty than doing a little bit extra for your customers!

Hand-out it at your retail POS (in exchange for an email address especially from tourists visiting you for the first time) or use it to reach potential new customers at local events, through direct mail or cross-promote with other related businesses, instead of using a boring (and expensive) brochure. (Those are just a few ideas of how to use this versatile marketing tool; we’ve got more!)

To receive your free sample copy, just send an email to: Bobbie@ColdNosesNews.com.

(Looking for other K9-exclusive, original digital content? We can also create eNewsletters, blogs, web content and social media posts for you too. Just ask.)

RECALL: Smallbatch Pets Frozen Dog Sliders

smallbatch-pets-duckbatch-sliders

 

 

 

 

Smallbatch Pets Frozen Dog Food Recall

Just two hours after our recent post about making your own dog treats (due to the increased recalls in dog foods/treats), a new recall came to our attention from the FDA (actually released on March 26th) about Smallbatch Pets Inc. voluntarily recalling one lot of their frozen Duckbatch Sliders (for dogs) due to potential salmonella and listeria.  (Interestingly, there’s nothing posted on the SmallBatch website at the time of writing this post.)

According to the FDA release, “the affected products are sold frozen in 3-pound bags and can be identified with the following manufacturing codes:

  • Lot #CO27
  • UPC #713757339001
  • Best By Date: 01/27/2017

and were distributed to retail pet food stores in California, Colorado, Oregon and Washington.”

According to the FDA release, there have been no pet or consumer illnesses reported from this product at this time. The recall was issued after “routine testing” by the FDA from a sample taken at a distributor. Eighty cases of this specific product lot were sold between the dates of February 23rd through March 10th.

Consumers who touched this contaminated product should thoroughly wash their hands and disinfect any surfaces exposed to this product. Human symptoms from being infected with salmonella and/or listeria include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Infected pets may be lethargic, have a decreased appetite and abdominal pain and also exhibit diarrhea, fever and vomiting.

If you purchased frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders from the affected Lot #CO27, do not feed or touch the product and return to the place of purchase for a full refund or throw them out where your dog, animals or humans cannot reach them.

To read the voluntary recall release in its entirety, go to the FDA Recalls & Safety Alerts Page.

Consumers may also call Smallbatch Pets Inc., at 888-507-2712 or email them at info@smallbatchpets.com.

Bake Some Homemade Dog Treats in a New York Minute!

egg-944495_640With all the recent dog food and treat recalls, you may be thinking about making your own treats for your K9 family member(s).

A few simple ingredients (you might already have in your kitchen) and five minutes in the microwave and you have yummy, homemade dog treats with NO preservatives, additives or questionable ingredients or chemicals.

And, from the reaction of our resident Great Danes (who of course volunteered to taste-test), it’s a home run!

Quickie K9 Treats:

  • 2 chicken bouillon cubes
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup stone ground cornmeal
  • 1-1/2 cups powdered skim milk
  • 1 cup quick cooking rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten

Dissolve bouillon cubes in boiling water and set aside until room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, combine all dry ingredients. (I added parsley; you could also add mint, chopped nuts, garlic or carrots or some other favorite ingredient your dog loves.)

Make a well in the dry ingredients and gradually stir in oil, eggs and cooled bouillon until well-blended.

Knead dough on a floured surface, about 4-5 minutes, until dough sticks together and is easy to work with.dough-529948_640

Roll dough to between 1/4″ and 1/2″ thickness.

Cut-out treats with your favorite cookie cutter (or just use a shot glass like I did) and place on a microwave-proof surface in the microwave (I used a dinner plate).

Microwave for 5 minutes.*

Remove and cool. Store in sealed plastic bags or containers.


* Here’s the cooking directions from the original recipe: microwave 5 minutes at medium heat. Turn over each biscuit and then microwave for another 5 minutes and turn again. Microwave another 2-5 minutes. Remove, cool and store. I found simply microwaving at 5 minutes full power worked nicely, so why spend extra time? My microwave is small (just large enough for a dinner plate) and only 900 watts.

Think someone is looking out for your dog’s food? Think again.

What do You Believe?

Until recently, I had always “assumed” (yes, I know!) that “someone” was looking out for MY dogs and what they were eating. Isn’t thatDog-Food what the never-ending, heartwarming dog food commercials want you to believe?

ESPECIALLY in a nation that has the highest dog population (currently estimated between 70-80 million dogs in the USA according to the ASPCA).

For those of us who consider our canines “family members” (which is almost 67% of us according to the AVMA), the potential realization that no one is really “minding the store” is not only disturbing, but potentially catastrophic! Especially when you understand the full scope of annual pet food sales in just the United States alone (Source: www.statista.com/topics/1369/pet-food/):

  • Dry Dog Food Sales: $9.2B;
  • Wet Dog Food Sales: $2.4B; and
  • Dry Cat Food Sales: $3.8B!

Did you know that “The FDA and USDA does not require mandatory inspections of dog food companies. Quality control is voluntarily enforced.” (ConsumerAffairs.com) Is “voluntary enforcement” really enough for the safety and overall health of your dog? Is “voluntary enforcement” even enough to address just the potential bacteria contamination and mold growth from inconsistent temperature conditions especially with excessive heat and humidity?

When No One is “Minding the Store:” A Real-Life Case Study

Last spring, SeekingAlpha.com reported on complaints from consumers about finding mold in some Freshpet products. The moldy products were reported to be “unexpired and unopened, with no discernible damage to the packaging.” That means that the contamination occurred at the manufacturing facility.  (Click here to learn more about the Freshpet mold contamination including pictures, a map of the affected stores and personal stories from consumers.)

Despite our best efforts, we could not find ANY english-bulldog-538485_640recall(s) issued from Freshpet for the reported moldy products. But we did find one customer complaint of all three dogs becoming ill after inadvertently eating the moldy food; one dog even died. Freshpet’s response? “FreshPet sent two $20.00 coupons for more food and paid the vet bills … The CEO said something to me about people making up stories to drive the stocks down.

Still think “voluntary enforcement” is good enough for your dog and the food he eats?

What You May Not Know About “Made in the USA”

After the huge pet food/treat recalls in 2007 (killing more than an estimated thousand dogs (many cats also died) due to an imported contaminated ingredient, melamine, from China and this had been going on for SEVEN years before any recalls were issued), consumers no longer had confidence in pet food or treats from outside the USA. So it soon became a popular and common practice to label pet foods and treats with “Made in the USA” (along with even the American flag) in an attempt to provide consumers with a false sense of security that these products were safe and made in the United States.

Made in USAWhile the actual food may be made (assembled) in the USA, some or many of the individual ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, supplements and fillers) may actually be sourced from outside the USA! Our research indicated outsourced ingredients coming from the following countries including: Canada, India, Italy, Morocco, Germany, France, Indonesia, Egypt, China, Philippines, New Zealand, Switzerland, Netherlands, Israel, Argentina, Spain, Australia and Scotland.

If the FDA and USDA are not looking out for the well-being of our pets, do you really trust that other countries are more concerned about the health of your pets over their profits?

What Should You Do?

Do your research and make sure the “experts” you’re looking to for accurate and non-biased information are fully supported by pet food consumers (like you and me) and NOT the pet food companies (because that “ax” they have to grind is literally worth billions of dollars!).

Follow – or subscribe, if possible – to pet food recall alerts. We recommend subscribing or following several different sources to get the latest information as quickly as possible:

To learn more about your dog’s food, please visit the following websites and subscribe to their newsletters to stay current on the latest information and recommendations:


Disclosure: We want you to know that we have not been paid – or in any way compensated – by anyone or any manufacturer of pet/dog food or treats. The research in this posting was done and presented here out of a true love for dogs and their best health and safety. Our company, Cold Noses News, was founded on the belief that when people know better, they do better; and our mission is to bring our readers – fellow dog lovers – the very best information upon which to base their decisions for their furry, four-legged best friends.


Memo From Your Dog: Tomorrow is “National Dog Biscuit Day!”

dog-bones-350092_640Please excuse us as we interrupt your Monday for a very important announcement from your four-legged family member: tomorrow is “National Dog Biscuit Day” (Tuesday, February 23rd).

You’re welcome!

It’s been a pet-worthy month for those critters we welcome into our homes, onto our couches and into our beds.  From “Pet Dental Health Month” and “Responsible Pet Owners Month” to “Love Your Pet Day” (on February 20th) and finally to close out the month, “National Dog Biscuit Day” (coming up tomorrow, Tuesday, February 23rd).

Oh,  and by the way? Your dog(s) would really love some FRESH, HOMEMADE dog biscuits …  🙂

Now wait! Before you panic and run to Walmart for that industrial-sized box of Ol’ Roy biscuits that probably taste like stale old concrete,  making yummy dog biscuits is not as hard as you may think! It’s also a fun family activity which makes your home smell SO good and your dog ever so grateful!

To make it even easier, we’re going to give you a foolproof, simple recipe that our own resident Great Danes have tasted and given four-paws up to … Paws Lick’n Chick’n Cheesy Bites! Just seven ingredients you may already have in your kitchen too!

Ready? Here we go …


Paws Lick’n Chick’n Cheesy Bites
3 cups white flour
3/4 cup yellow cornmeal
1 cup chicken broth
4 tablespoons softened margarine (we prefer using butter)

2 cups shredded low-fat cheddar cheese

1 egg +1 tablespoon milk

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Combine flour, cornmeal, chicken broth, margarine (butter) and cheese.

Knead dough for 3 minutes. Apply a light layer of flour to rolling surface and rolling pin. Roll dough to 1/4 thickness and stamp out biscuits with your favorite cookie cutter (we like shapes like bones and fire hydrants!). Place on ungreased cookie sheet(s).

Beat egg and milk together and brush on top of biscuits.

Bake for 35 minutes or golden brown.

Makes two dozen biscuits and one VERY happy dog!

February Means Having Love for Your Pets Too!

For most of us, say the word “February” and one of the next things to pop into our mind is “Valentine’s Day.” And while we would never downplay the importance of human love (and memorializing it with copious amounts of chocolate, flowers and sparkly trinkets), did you realize that February also focuses on loving those ever-present critters in our life, our pets?

While the entire month is dedicated to “Pet Dental Health” and “Responsible Pet Owners,” there’s also “Love Your Pet Day” (coming up on February 20th) and “National Dog Biscuit Day” (coming up on February 23rd).

Yes, the month of February is full of reminders to love and protect our beloved pets.

From proper socialization to finding the right diet; from the best positive training to effectively controlling parasites; and from regular vet visits to making sure their golden years are as smooth and pain-free as possible, our pets are a huge presence – and responsibility – in our life.

So as you go through the rest of this month and celebrate that special bond with your particular pet, consider brushing up on the latest research on medical care, best food practices and even emergency measures in the face of a disaster to ensure you love and protect your pet to the best of your ability.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to make a couple of buckets of dog treats for my Great Danes for “National Dog Biscuit Day” . . .

Are Holiday Treats Dog-Friendly?

The holidays are quickly approaching with mouth-watering smells and delectable seasonal treats!

Something else is coming too … sad, SAD puppy eyes!

While most of us will probably indulge during the season, it doesn’t necessarily mean our dogs should follow our lead.

You may actually be surprised by some of the holiday foods and/or ingredients your four-legged family member should not partake of; below is a quick list.


Want to know about additional foods and WHY they are bad for your dog?

Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!

Want a dog-friendly treat you can make in advance for those oh-so-sad puppy eyes?

Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!


iStock_000013402168XSmallAnd remember … the smaller the dog, the faster – and more toxic – the adverse effect.

So keep these items out of reach of your inquisitive (and always  hungry) resident canine!

  • Pumpkin Pie, Filling or Mix
  • Avocados and/or guacamole
  • Onions and garlic (included powdered, raw, cooked and dehydrated)
  • Grapes, raisins and currants
  • Fat Trimmings
  • Unbaked yeast dough

Want to know more? Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!

Ice Cream for your DOG?! Yes!

Speaking of treats that are GOOD for your dog, how about some ice cream?!

Yes, ice cream for your dogs!

“Frosty Paws” (in your grocer’s freezer, right next to your favorite frozen treats) has been around for a while; but tend to be pricey for a treat that disappears quickly. Have some ripe bananas, plain yogurt and peanut butter? Whip up a cool treat for your dog with your own healthy ingredients!

Let us know in the comments below how YOUR dog rated the ice cream … one or two paws up?

2015-05-10 00.55.46

Are ALL Healthy Snacks Good for Dogs?

You’re probably just like me, I only want the very best for my dogs!

With the recent upswing in dog treat recalls, many dog owners are turning to healthy and natural dog treat alternatives for their four-legged family members.

But, do you know that not all snacks (even the healthy ones) are good for your dog?

Below is an infographic illustrating which natural foods are good … and not good … for your dog. Print a copy, review with your family and then post on your refrigerator as a simple reminder in keeping your beloved dog safe!

Did You Know that All Natural Snacks are Not Created Equal for Your Dog?

All Natural Snacks are Not Created Equal for Your Dog!

 

Safe Treats? Make Your Own!

With all the recent recalls, many pet owners wonder if there truly is a “safe” treat.

Why not make your own?

It doesn’t have to be diffiHappy-Dog-Picturecult or even expensive with a dehydrator. Don’t have one? No problem, warm up that oven and create healthy and safe treats for your dog.

Jerky is one of the easiest treats you can make for your pet. Take meat or even sweet potatoes, cut into strips of even thickness; coat baking sheets with non-stick cooking spray and preheat the oven to 170 degrees. Bake your strips for 6-7 hours checking and turning each strip every hour so they dry evenly.

NOTE: Do NOT bake or dehydrate jerky treats to where they are excessively dry and hard; sharp edges could potentially injure your dog’s sensitive digestive system.

Share your favorite recipes (and pictures of taste-testing) with us here!

“Bone” appetit!

Staying on Top of Pet Food and Treat Recalls

The health of one’s beloved pets is a priority for any pet guardian. But keeping up with all the recent recalls on pet food and treats can be a full-time detective job! So what can you do to keep your pet safe from possible health threats in their food or treats?

PetMd.com has the answer! Sign up for their instant email alerts on recalled products and keep your beloved pets safe from potential health hazards!

Go here for more information: www.petmd.com/news/topics/alert-recalls.