Category Archives: Pet Food

Guest Blog: What’s New In Poo?

Courtesy: Pexels.com

Ever been woken up at three in the morning by the cold nose of your dog, whining to go out? On the one hand, you want nothing more than to roll over and pull the covers over your head, hoping the moment will pass. But on the other hand, you worry about what your carpet might look like if you don’t get up … so, of course, you get up.

 

Diarrhea

Bristol Stool ChartDiarrhea is an inconvenient, smelly, sleep-depriving condition resulting from abnormal gastrointestinal (GI) function. Poop comes in a variety of consistencies and colors. A scoring chart, like the Bristol Stool Chart pictured here, presents seven categories of stool, helping standardize parameters for consistency.

There are two types of diarrhea:

  1. Large bowel diarrhea: the most common type with signs of frequent straining (3-7 bowel movements/day), mucous, and soft-to-watery stool (which may contain blood).
  2. Small bowel diarrhea: less common, and results in once or twice a day large amounts of liquid stool.

Typically, these two types of diarrhea have quite different causes.

 

Causes Behind Dog Diarrhea

The role of the intestines is to break down food and absorb small nutrients, while the colon absorbs water and leaves behind excrement we call “poop.”

Diarrhea occurs when there is a disruption of the cells lining the gut and/or loss of the protective mucus layer. Without the protective mucus layer or fully functioning cells, large molecules are now able to enter the bloodstream and body, triggering the immune system and creating inflammation. This immune response leads to a malfunction of the intestines in which the water is not adequately removed, leaving behind a watery mess we call “diarrhea.”

Although you may never know the culprit, potential causes of K9 diarrhea include:

  • Parasitic worms
  • Giardia
  • Bacterial or viral infections
  • “Garbage gut:” ingesting plants, mulch, dead animals, and things outside
  • Stress colitis: anxiety-inducing changes in the environment, people, loud noises, etc. (1) Even the stress and anxiety felt at the groomers or boarding kennels can impact and heighten stress-hormones (i.e. cortisol, adrenaline) that then alter the normal function and motility of the GI tract. (2)  This stress, or disease, can also activate dormant infections in the gut, such as Clostridium Perfringens (i.e. C. Perfringens, which produces harmful toxins) or Giardia (which causes maldigestion and malabsorption) resulting in diarrhea.

Overall, although diarrhea can creep up suddenly (referred to as “acute”), if recurring or lasts more than 3 days (referred to as chronic), with no signs of improvement, it may be a concern. If your dog is experiencing chronic-recurring or ongoing diarrhea, visit a veterinarian to get a diagnosis of the problem and appropriate treatment.

 

The Microbiome

Courtesy: www.AnimalBiome.com

The intestinal tract is a complicated organ. Recent human and animal investigations are revealing the important and positive interactions between helpful bacteria and fungi in the gut (the microbiome), hormones, and immune cells in contributing to a healthy life. (3,4)

When healthy and functioning normally, the gut contains a large variety of virus, bacteria, and fungi which live symbiotically (in a mutually beneficial way) within the body. The body provides food (i.e., fiber, starch, sugars) for the bacteria and in turn, they make healthy nutrients, such as Vitamin B, Vitamin K, and short-chain fatty acids, to be absorbed by the body. Studies have documented that in the presence of anxiety, depression, IBD, or chronic diarrhea there is also a disbalance of the microbiome (with significantly less bacteria variety) termed “dysbiosis.” (5)

“You Are What You Eat” Applies to Your Dog Too!

You’ve probably heard the old expression, “you are what you eat.” Well, that also applies to your pets! Food, chemicals, and medications all impact the health of the microbiome. Since the microbiome – which includes bacteria from the mouth to bum – plays such an important role in overall health, it is best not to treat diarrhea the traditional way using antibiotics such as Metronidazole unless it is absolutely necessary. (6) While antibiotics may be effective at treating diarrhea, they are also indiscriminate killers of bacteria and wreak havoc on the important bacteria of the microbiome.

 

Relieving Diarrhea And Restoring Normal Function

Mother Nature has her own recipe to repair and promote a healthy gastrointestinal tract called Colostrum, which is the DoggyStat, Natural and Rapid K9 Diarrhea Relieffirst milk produced by mammals immediately after giving birth. It is a nutrient-rich fluid that contains immune, growth, and tissue repair factors. Colostrum contains a significant number of complementary components that act as natural anti-microbial agents to actively stimulate the maturation and repair of the immune system and “leaky gut.” (5)

A new twist on an old idea, Anubis Bio has harnessed the power of colostrum along with eggs and a variety of protective proteins to develop DoggyStat: an all-natural food supplement that has been used to quickly improve many causes of diarrhea with 1-2 servings within 36 hours.

What’s more, it is 100% made in the USA. Just one packet of DoggyStat works on any size dog at any age. Dogs think it’s a tasty treat; plus it’s easy to administer as a powder on their food as shown in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhM5-F2JLuQ. DoggyStat can also be dissolved in a small amount of water (1/8 cup or 15-20 ml) if you need to syringe feed.

Great results have also been achieved using DoggyStat in combination with a bland diet made of rice and boiled chicken, as well as prebiotic and probiotic supplements for a few days to address K9 diarrhea safely and naturally.

My suggestion is to keep DoggyStat on hand for those middle of the night diarrhea occurrences so you and your dog can get a good night’s sleep!


>> Before you purchase DoggyStat, click here to receive a discount on our “We Recommend” page! <<


Meet our Guest Blogger: Dr. Khodakhah

Dr. Khodakhah works as a small animal relief veterinarian.  Following her passion to help wildlife, stray animals, and owners in need, she directs international veterinary spay/neuter programs and works with the Wolf Conservation Center (NY). She leverages her entrepreneurial spirit and experience to drive meaningful change in the veterinary profession, becoming a Certified Professional Coach to help arm young doctors with the tools they needed to succeed. With a similar mission, she produces a podcast, Time to PAWS, which features common experiences in vet med, promoting opportunities, leaning into fear, while building strategies for resilience. She is an Advisory Board Member of several organizations and enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, good food, and scuba diving.

You can learn more about Dr. Khodakhah on her LinkedIn and Facebook pages.


References

  1. E. Mondo, M. Barone, M. Soverini, F. D’Amico, M. Cocchi, C. Petrulli, M. Mattioli, G. Marliani, M. Candela and P.A. Accorsia,∗. (Jan 2020). Gut microbiome structure and adrenocortical activity in dogs with aggressive and phobic behavioral disorders. Heliyon; 6(1).
  2. Megan Clapp, Nadia Aurora, Lindsey Herrera, Manisha Bhatia, Emily Wilen, and Sarah Wakefield. (Sep 2017). Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis Clin Pract. 15; 7(4): 987.
  3. Rachel Pilla* and Jan S. Suchodolski. (Jan 2020). The Role of the Canine Gut Microbiome and Metabolome in Health and Gastrointestinal Disease Front. Vet. Sci., 14.
  4. M. Hasan Mohajeri, Robert J. M. Brummer, Robert A. Rastall, Rinse K. Weersma, Hermie J. M. Harmsen, Marijke Faas, and Manfred Eggersdorfer. (2018). The role of the microbiome for human health: from basic science to clinical applications. Eur J Nutr.; 57(Suppl 1): 1–14.
  5. Jin Young Yoon, Soo Jung Park, and Jae Hee Cheon. (Jan 2014). Effect of Colostrum on the Symptoms and Mucosal Permeability in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Placebo-controlled Study. Intestinal Res.; 12(1): 80–82.
  6. Suchodolski JS, Dowd SE, Westermarck E, Steiner JM, Wolcott RD, Spillmann T, et al. (2009). The effect of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin on microbial diversity in the canine small intestine as demonstrated by massive parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing. BMC Microbiol. 9:210.

RECALL: Sunshine Mills Dog Food Products

Recall Notice

UPDATE: On October 8th, Sunshine Mills, Inc., based in Alabama, expanded their voluntary recall of dog food products for aflatoxin, a naturally-occurring mold by-product. No illnesses have been reported as of October 8th.

After the initial recall on September 2nd, an investigation revealed corn-based pet food products (produced between April 3-5, 2020) came from a single load of corn with elevated levels of aflatoxin.

The recall now includes all the brands listed below:

  • Hunter’s Special
  • Sprout
  • Champ
  • Thrifty
  • Top Runner
  • Sportsmans Pride
  • Old Glory
  • Field Trial
  • Whiskers & Tails
  • Good Dog
  • Paws Happy Life
  • Pet Expert
  • Principle
  • Retriever
  • River Bend

No other Sunshine Mills Inc. products are affected at this time.

For more information, including a complete list of recalled products, Lot Codes and UPC Codes, visit the FDA website

Sources: Dog Food Advisor and Truth About Pet Food

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On September 2, 2020, Sunshine Mills, Inc., issued a voluntary recall for some of their dog food products. Sunshine Mills manufactures dog food products under the brand names of Family Pet®, Heartland Farms®, or Paws Happy Life®.

This voluntary recall was issued due to elevated levels of Aflatoxin beyond acceptable limits. Aflatoxin is a naturally-occurring mold/fungus (from the growth of Aspergillus flavus on foods) which can infect pets if consumed in significant quantities. 

 

Aflatoxin – and other molds – can cause serious illnesses in people or pets with a weakened, suppressed, or compromised immune system, underlying lung disease, or asthma.

 

The elevated levels of Aflatoxin were discovered through routine testing by the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry with a single 4-pound bag of dog food. While no adverse health effects related to these recalled products have been reported to date, Sunshine Mills, in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, issued a voluntary recall. 

The recalled products were distributed nationally in retail stores. There are no other Family Pet®, Heartland Farms®, or Paws Happy Life® products or other lot codes of these products affected by this precautionary recall.

 

The Sunshine Mills Products Recalled

 

 

Recalled Dog Food Products from Sunshine Mills, Inc.

 

Recalled Dog Food from Sunshine Mills, Inc.

 

Symptoms of Illness from Aflatoxin Consumption

Dogs that consumed any of the recalled products and are exhibiting the following symptoms should be seen by their veterinarian:

  • Reluctance to eat
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy or sluggishness
  • A yellowish tint to the eyes or gums
  • Diarrhea 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop using any of the recalled products and return the unused portion to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers may contact Customer Service at Sunshine Mills at 800-705-2111, Monday – Friday from 7am to 4pm Central time or via email at customer.service@sunshinemills.com

Sources: Truth About Pet Food, VCA Hospitals, and the FDA.


© 2020. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

Dog Kibble: The Ugly Truth Behind Meat By-Products

Kibble for dogs is convenient and offers a long shelf life. But there is much more than meets the eye when it comes to commercial dog food especially when it comes to what is really in your dog’s food!

 Keep reading to learn about the not-so-pretty facts behind the common meat by-products found in most kibbles.

 

Since 1956, commercial kibble has become a common and convenientColorful Kibble Dog Food staple in most households with dogs. So much so that in just 2019, Nestle Purina Petcare Company sold $1.99 billion followed by Mars Petcare at $1.31 billion in just the United States alone!

But while dry dog food is a useful convenience in our busy lives, there are potentially serious and unseen issues when it comes to feeding your dog dry kibble as a day-to-day diet. Issues you will never see when you look at those little dried squares! But what you can’t see can hurt your dog.

 

The Kibble Manufacturing Process

Manufacturing kibble involves extreme pressurized steam and temperatures. This alone negatively affects the overall quality nutrition and vitamins as much as 50%! This process also kills the beneficial and natural enzymes your dog’s body needs every day. 

 

Meat By-Products in K9 Kibble

Pet food labels are full of “meat by-products” and “meat by-product meals.” But what exactly does that mean? But even more importantly, what does that mean for your dog’s health and safety?

According to the dictionary, a by-product is “a secondary or incidental product, as in a process of manufacture.” In other words, animal by-products (also called offal) come from the leftovers – or meat processing scrap – after all the premium meat for human consumption has been removed. At the end of the day, dog food manufacturers use meat by-products because they are much cheaper to use in dog food instead of premium cuts of meats fit for human consumption.

While some veterinary organizations and even “experts” may insist there is no harm in feeding your dog by-products, you need to consider the following three points.  

While it’s much less revolting for a consumer to read “meat by-products” instead of “spleen, lungs, intestines, blood and plasma” on their dog’s food label, there is no way to guarantee the consistency of the specific ingredients included as “by-products” and the actual nutrition in each product.

While meat by-products may not come from inferior or unsafe meat ingredients, most are considered unfit for human consumption. Also, most by-products are further processed into meals or powders with high temperatures which can affect the overall nutrition and protein quality of these meals or powders (just like mentioned above in the general manufacturing process).

Most meat by-products are listed generically instead of listing the source (species) of the meat. If your dog is allergic to certain kinds of meats, this could pose a very real danger for your dog if he eats meat by-products his system cannot tolerate.

While it may seem you are feeding your dog nutritious and healthy dog food from the commercials and labels, the excessive processing – more accurately, overcooking – has very negative effects on the actual nutrition your dog is – or isn’t – getting which can lead to serious, even life-threatening health issues over an extended period.

 Also, another critical factor in animal by-products is how they are handled after slaughter. Much of it is not safely stored (like the premium meat for human consumption) which can lead to the presence of mold, bacteria and worse before being processed and included in dog food.

Did you also know that legally, generic meat by-products can include diseased, dying or dead zoo animals, roadkill, spoiled supermarket meat and euthanized animals? It explains how traces of a euthanasia drug was found in dog and cat foods and treats. (Admitted to by the former AAFCO, American Feed Control Officials, President Hersh Pendell via a YouTube Video.)

What Should a Dog Owner Do?

Do your own research for your dog’s specific needs, health and activity level. Finding animal or meat by-products in your dog’s food does not make it automatically bad; but it can mean it is made with cheaper ingredients.

Make sure the experts you rely on for accurate information are supported by dog food consumers just like you, not the pet food companies who have a lot of profit at stake, literally billions of dollars!

Even if you need to feed your dog a dry kibble diet, find the best one possible. Then add some fresh ingredients to boost the overall nutrition, vitamins, minerals and enzymes with these great tips from the Dogs Naturally Magazine: 15 Tips to Improve Your Dog’s Diet Today.

Below are well-known, independent experts in the pet industry who can give you the best information.  

  1. Susan Thixton, Truth About Pet Food & Publisher of the PetsumerReport
  2. Rodney Habib, Pet Nutrition Blogger & Founder of Planet Pets
  3. Whole Dog Journal
  4. Dogs Naturally Magazine
  5. Association for Pet Food Safety (sister website of TruthAboutPetFood)

When you know better, you can do better for your beloved canine and the quality of his life, health and happiness!

 

Additional Reading:

Truth About Pet Food: Say Bye, Bye to Pet Foods with By-Products

Cummings Veterinary Medical Center: Don’t Be Bothered By By-Products

Dog Food Advisor: The Truth About Animal By-Products in Dog Food

Modern Farmer: Something’s Rotten in the Pet Food Industry

Dogs Naturally Magazine: Why 99% of Dog Food is Fake

 

Image Credits:

Mat Coulton from Pixabay 

Denise Coyle from Pixabay 

Komsan Boonde from Pixabay 

Salah Ait Mokhtar from Pixabay 

Ludwig Willimann from Pixabay 

StockSnap from Pixabay 

Free-Photos from Pixabay 


 

RECALL: Carnivora Fresh Frozen Patties for Dogs and Cats

On June 15, 2020, a voluntary recall for Carnivora Fresh Frozen Patties for Dogs and Cats was issued. This recall is unique because it involves potential contamination with E. coli O157 a particularly dangerous strain of E. coli bacteria for humans

This specific strain of E. coli can cause cross-contamination and serious, even life-threatening illnesses in humans by simply handling the contaminated product. As of June 12th, four cases of human illness have been reported in Canada. Approximately 1,803 affected units were sold in Canada starting on January 13, 2020 until the recall. 

 

The Risk Behind E. coli O157

E. coli O157 produces a powerful toxin that damages the lining of the small intestine which may cause bloody diarrhea. According to the recall issued on the Healthy Canadians website, “some people infected with E. coli O157 do not get sick at all, though they can still spread the infection to others.” 

 

The Carnivora Products Recalled

 

 

E. coli O157: What You Need to Know

There are hundreds of strains of the E. coli bacteria and most are harmless and live in the intestines of both animals and humans. But according to the Mayo Clinic, the E. coli O157 strain, involved in this recall of raw pet food, is not harmless and can cause severe stomach cramps, pain or tenderness, bloody diarrhea and even nausea and vomiting in some people. Most healthy adults will recover on their own within a week to ten days with rest and plenty of hydration. But if diarrhea is persistent, severe or bloody, see your doctor. 

The Health Canada website also warns, “Pregnant women, those with weakened immune systems, young children and older adults are most at risk for developing serious complications (like a life-threatening form of kidney failure) and might need hospitalization.”

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop using any of the recalled products and contact the retailer where they purchased the products for a full refund or exchange.  Consumers may contact Carnivora Pet Food 888-665-0856, Monday – Friday from 8:30 am-4:30 pm CST or via email at: carnivorarecall@carnivora.ca.

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor, Carnivora Pet Food, Healthy Canadians and the Mayo Clinic.


© 2020. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

RECALL: Icelandic Plus Dog & Cat Treats

 

Thankfully it’s been pretty quiet when it comes to product recalls for our beloved pets.

But on Monday, March 23rd, the FDA published a new recall for Whole Capelin Fish Pet Treats made by IcelandicPlus LLC of Fort Washington, PA. The recall was issued because some of the fish “exceeded the FDA compliance guidelines for fish larger than 5 inches.” While there have been no reports of illness as of the date of publication, Icelandic+ is cooperating with the recall because of a possible health risk. 

 

Icelandic+

The FDA has determined that salt-cured, dried, or fermented un-eviscerated fish larger than 5 inches have been linked to outbreaks of botulism poisoning in humans between 1981 and 1987 and again in 1991. 

Icelandic Plus says that as of March 23rd, “there have been no reported illnesses of dogs, cats or people in connection with the recalled product.” In addition, there are no positive test results for Clostridium botulinum (botulism poisoning) in connection with the Capelin product.

IcealandicPlus-Capelin-Whole-Fish-Pet-Treat-Recall.jpg

The recalled product comes in a:

  1. Clear plastic tube (2.5 ounces); or
  2. Clear plastic bag (1.5 or 2.5 ounces)

Both the tubes and packages are printed with either:

  • Icelandic+ Capelin WHOLE FISH, PURE FISH TREATS FOR DOGS; or
  • Icelandic+ Capelin PURE FISH TREATS FOR CATS.

The recalled UPC codes are:

  • 8 5485400775 9;
  • 8 5485400711 7; and
  • 8 5485400757 5.

The recalled lot numbers are 02/2020 to 02/2022.

The Entire USA is Included in the Recall

The recalled product was shipped to distributors for sale to independent retail pet specialty stores throughout the USA.

 

Botulism Poisoning: What You Need to Know

The botulism toxin can cause severe symptoms including death in both animals eating tainted products as well as people handling the contaminated product or coming in contact with exposed and tainted surfaces.

Common symptoms of botulism poisoning include:

  • Dizziness;
  • Blurred or double vision;
  • Trouble speaking, swallowing or breathing;
  • Muscle weakness;
  • Distended abdomen; and
  • Constipation.

Pets or people experiencing any of these symptoms should seek immediate medical help.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop feeding any of the recalled products and return it to the store where it was purchased for a refund.  Consumers may contact the company at 857-246-9559, Monday – Friday from 8am-5pm EST.

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

© 2020. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

Is it Safe to Handle Your Pet’s Raw Food?

As the debate rages on about whether a raw diet* is good or not for our pets, below is an interesting study about the potential risk of humans getting sick or infected from handling their pet’s raw food. The study included over 16K pet households in 81 countries. The research is published in the BMJ journal Veterinary Record.

(*Raw food includes any meat, internal organs, bones and cartilage fed uncooked to pets.)

(Did you know that more than 60% of pet owners in the Netherlands feed raw?)

 


It’s safe to feed raw food to pets, finds new study.


 

RECALL: Texas Tripe Raw Pet Food

 

The USDA (US Food and Drug Administration) issues a recall alert on August 14th regarding 35 frozen lots of Texas Tripe Raw Pet Food (manufactured by Texas Tripe Inc).

The recall was issued after samples tested positive for Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes. Testing was done by the Office of the Texas State Chemist (OTSC). Of the 23 samples tested,  16 were positive.

The recalled products were sold frozen in 20- and 40-pound cases containing multiple plastic pouches in 23 product varieties. NOTE: There are no unique identifications numbers on the individual chubs (plastic pouches) to identify them as the recalled products. Lot codes are only printed on the outside of the cases.

Here is the list of all the recalled products and lot numbers:

(Courtesy: The Dog Advisor)

The States Included in the Recall

The recalled products were sold directly to consumers (online and over the phone) in the following states:

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

 

ALSO … A Special Note

The products below were also tested and showed positive for Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes but have NOT been recalled.

  • Texas Tripe Chicken Blend: Lot 19196-6
  • Texas Tripe Pork Blend: Lot 19190-09
  • Texas Tripe Beef Blend: Lot 19191-05

Pet treats and food contaminated with Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes pose a public health concern because they can affect both the health of animals and humans. Refrigeration or even freezing does not kill the bacteria.

 

What You Should Know About Salmonella

Salmonella poses a risk to animals ingesting the affected product (including dogs and cats) and humans. Pets infected with salmonella may display symptoms including:

  • Fever;
  • Lethargy and shock;
  • Diarrhea (which may last up to 3-4 weeks or longer);
  • Vomiting;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Dehydration; and
  • Mucus and/or blood in the stool.

People infected with salmonella can also have:

  • Diarrhea;
  • Fever; and
  • Abdominal cramps.

For some people, their diarrhea may be severe enough to require hospitalization.

 

What You Should Know About Listeria Monocytogenes

Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans (if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product). Pets infected with listeria may display symptoms including:

  • Mild to severe diarrhea;
  • Anorexia;
  • Fever;
  • Nervous, muscular and respiratory system issues;
  • Abortion;
  • Depression; and
  • Shock and even death.

Infected animals can also serve as sources of infection to other household animals and humans.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop feeding any of the recalled products and discard them in a secure container where stray animals or wildlife cannot access them.

Consumers should also:

  • Clean their refrigerator/freezers where the product was stored.
  • Thoroughly wash their hands after handling any recalled products.
  • Clean and disinfect any:
    • Utensils;
    • Bowls;
    • Surfaces including floors; and
    • Pet bedding and toys.

 

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

© 2019. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

Guest Blog: Should You Feed Your Dog a Raw Diet?

With the recent flurry of recalls and news stories about potential links of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) to grain-free pet foods, more pet owners are taking another look at feeding their pets a raw meat diet. Our guest blogger, Jade Bossenbroek, Founder of 4 Raw Pets Raw Feeding, dissects this important subject below.


Why Feed Raw?

Some people might argue that our domestic cats and dogs with all the years of domesticating, breeding and being fed processed foods like kibble, they have adapted to live, survive and thrive on a more – or even complete – plant-based diet. But is this really true?

 

Carnivores vs Herbivores

Carnivore” literally means “meat-eater” in Latin. “True” carnivores (called obligate carnivores), are meat-eaters whose survival depends and thrives on nutrients found in animal flesh because they lack the necessary physiology required to digest a large amount of plant material.  In other words, true carnivores must eat meat to survive. Cats, dogs and even ferrets are obligate carnivores. Their bodies are anatomically adapted to eating meat in the following ways:

  • Their teeth are sharp and pointy, meant for holding, tearing and crushing, all of which are needed for a meat-based diet.
  • Carnivores have a very short digestive tract, so food passes through fast and as such the food has got to be easily absorbed to be useful.
  • They do not have the enzymes to break down carbohydrates found in plant-based products.
  • They produce enzymes specifically for breaking down meat in their stomach.
  • The saliva found in their mouths is better suited to prevent cavities, there are no digestive enzymes present in their saliva, it is purely designed to get the food down into the stomach where the digestive process can start.

For the carnivore, meat protein is necessary for healthy muscles and organs. Meat also contains important vitamins, minerals and amino acids that help the body function in every way; including metabolism, brain function and healing. In contrast, feeding high carbohydrate diets (like kibble and other processed foods) can lead to many health issues for the carnivore such as allergies, gum disease, tooth decay and much more.

It is said that all the amino acids needed to function can be found in meat in the right levels; one of which is taurine, an ingredient only found in muscle and organ meat (large amounts of taurine can be found in the brain, retina and heart). This amino acid cannot be found in – or replaced by – plant-based protein. Cats and also foxes need a higher concentration of taurine compared to dogs. Without it, they can suffer from:

  • Blindness;
  • Heart problems; and
  • Even death.

Meat also provides saturated fatty acids in usable forms (unlike many plant-based oils). Fatty acids are important for proper:

  • Hormone production
  • Energy
  • Cell membrane formation
  • Protection of vital organs

Saturated fatty acids in animal-based proteins range around 80-90%, whereas plant-based proteins only contain around 10-20%.

 

(To learn more, read Dogs: The Omnivore-Carnivore Question by Dr. Jeannie Thomason & Dr. Kim Bloomer)

 

On the other hand, an herbivore is an animal who is well-adapted to primarily beating plant material (anatomically and physiologically). In contrast to the carnivore, herbivores:

  • Have teeth that are flat with a jaw that moves from side to side to breakdown plant material.
  • Produce enzymes (starting in their mouths) to break down plant-based products; and
  • Have a longer digestive tract so plant-based material has time to pass through and be adequately absorbed.

 

The DNA Link

Whether you have Chihuahua or a German Shepard, domestic dogs and wolves share roughly 99.9% of their DNA and because of this, wolves and dogs also share a lot in common anatomically. No matter how domesticated your dog may be, it still has the same short digestive tract, sharp teeth and the same enzymes for breaking down meat as his ancestors over 10,000 years ago.

Wolves are strict meat-eaters, but they will sometimes supplement their diet with greens and berries. This mostly occurs when there’s a food shortage or when they feel under the weather or lacking something. Think of your dog eating grass and then throwing up. But some occasional plant materials does not automatically make them an omnivore as some suggest.

 

Is Your Pet REALLY Fine on a Kibble Diet?

Ok, you might be able to survive on McDonald’s every day, but would you really be healthy?

Sadly, it’s all too common for our pets to die from cancer or kidney failure today. These illnesses that weren’t all that common just 30 years ago are now claiming pet lives at an alarming rate. Just like with us humans, nutrition plays a critical part in the overall health and well-being of our pets.

Yes, of course not everything can be blamed on diet alone. Genetics, the environment, stress levels and more all play an important role. But there’s unrefutable proof there’s a strong connection between health and overall nutrition.

Today’s commercial kibble contains a high ratio of carbohydrates. In order to maximize their profits, the pet food industry has been adding carbohydrates in the form of fruits, vegetables and grains into their products instead of meat. Both vets and/or the pet food industry do not want to potentially discredit their own industry, but basic common sense and research really can unearth the deceitful marketing tactics and indiscretion of the industry.

Humans (who are omnivores – beings who can eat and survive on both plants and meat) identify fruits, vegetables and grains as “whole foods” with valuable vitamins and minerals. But for our carnivorous pets, they can’t digest these “whole food” carbohydrates fast enough to utilise most of the nutrients.

Many carbohydrates we consider healthy such as peas, carrots and rice (which all turn into sugars) are actually pretty high on the glycemic index (the measurement of sugar in the blood) for dogs, cats and ferrets. Some of these same carbohydrates are linked to serious heart conditions and even cancers in our pets. Besides running the risk of developing diabetes, high sugar content also affects hyperactivity and is often converted into fat leading to obesity, a current epidemic among household pets. A weight management diet isn’t going to help, whilst these formulas may drop the fat content, the content of fibre and grain is increased more, which can worsen the condition.

 

Kibble: The Additives

Since the nutritional value of the raw ingredients has been depleted during the intense manufacturing (cooking) process, the pet food industry then adds artificial vitamins and minerals to mimic a balanced diet. Unfortunately, the ratio of vitamins and minerals added to kibble – and other commercially produced pet foods – is generalised so it covers a wide range of pets. The numbers posted in the analysis section only indicate maximum and minimum numbers and are not exact (think of a recent Hills Science Food recall, where high levels of vitamin D were found).

Since these added vitamins and minerals are not customized to your individual pet (some pets may absorb more nutrients than others), for some animals, there can be too much (for instance) calcium or magnesium which can result in painful crystals.

Then last but not least, in addition to the above, artificial food colouring and flavouring is often added to make it more appealing and palatable to the consumer (for marketing purposes). Sadly, many of these artificial colour and flavour additives have the potential for undesirable and high-risk health issues for our pets as well.

 

Kibble: The Lack of Moisture

Another hidden problem in kibble is the lack of necessary moisture which begins to tax our pet’s kidneys and can result in eventual kidney failure. Dry kibble typically contains only 7%-10% moisture (whereas meat contains 70% and more) in moisture. Vets already recognise that hydration is important, so why are they recommending dry kibble diets when they contain so little moisture?

The lack of critical moisture eventually results in many common illnesses such as urinary tract infections and chronic kidney failure, especially in cats.

 

The Proof is in the Poo

Meat protein sources are highly bioavailable at 90-95% (an ingredient’s potential to be absorbed); whereas plant-based proteins are only around 70% bioavailable. This is why when comparing pets on a raw meat diet with those on a kibble diet, those on kibble have large, smelly poos because they are not completely digesting what they are eating and therefore producing more (smelly) waste.

 

The Final Word

In short, despite human views and lifestyle choices, obligate carnivores like dogs, cats and ferrets cannot thrive on diets of grains and vegetables. As a human, you might choose a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle, but those lifestyles should not be imposed on your carnivorous companion.


Meet our Guest Blogger:

Jade Bossenbroek, Founder of 4 Raw Pets Raw Feeding, turned to raw feeding after struggling to find a commercial dog food that would work for all four of her dogs. Each of the dogs was struggling with some kind of issue including flaky, smelly skin, hot spots, food-related allergies, strong dog smells and bouts of vomiting and explosive diarrhea. (She also lost a few cats at a young age form kidney failure.)  After doing research on raw feeding, Jade finally took the plunge and her dogs have been transformed for the better because of it. To help other dog guardians, Jade started the 4 Raw Pets website as a free resource to share her extensive research and information on species-appropriate, raw meat diets.


 

RECALL: Bulk Pig Ears Recalled in 33 States

UPDATE: 

The CDC has expanded its investigation to 27 states regarding the outbreak of human Salmonella infections because of contaminated bulk pig ear dog treats.

According to the CDC website, as of July 16th, 93 people have been infected with one of 3 genetic strains of the salmonella bacteria found on the bulk pig ear dog treats (from 27 states) and twenty people have been hospitalized. The CDC labels these infections as “multidrug-resistant.” Since it takes 2-4 weeks for a person to become ill (with diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps) after handling a contaminated pig ear, not all illnesses may have yet been reported.

Those at the greatest risk include children under the age of 5, adults 65 years and older and those with weakened immune systems.

In addition, infected pets can carry and infect other animals and humans.

Source: Dog Food Advisor and CDC.gov.

 


 

Pet Supplies Plus has issued a recall to over 400 retail stores in 33 states for bulk pig ears (dog treats).

The recall only includes bulk pig ears stocked in open bins. Prepackaged branded pig ears are not included in this recall.

The recall was issued after testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development revealed the presence of Salmonella.

The States Included in the PSP Recall

Bulk Pig Ear Dog Treats are Being Recalled

The recall involves Pet Supplies Plus stores in:

Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

 

ALSO … An Investigation

On July 3rd, the FDA (together with the CDC) announced an investigation of contaminated pig ear dog treats that may be connected to human, drug-resistant Salmonella infections that have sickened 45 people in 13 states with 12 patients hospitalized from coming into contact with the contaminated pig ears.

The recall may or may not be related.

 

What You Should Know About Salmonella

Salmonella poses a risk to animals ingesting the affected product (including dogs and cats) and humans. Pets infected with salmonella may display symptoms including:

  • Fever;
  • Lethargy and shock;
  • Diarrhea (which may last up to 3-4 weeks or longer);
  • Vomiting;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Dehydration; and
  • Mucus and/or blood in the stool.

People infected with salmonella can also have:

  • Diarrhea;
  • Fever; and
  • Abdominal cramps.

For some people, their diarrhea may be severe enough to require hospitalization.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately stop feeding any recalled pig ears and discard them in a secure container where stray animals or wildlife cannot access them. Consumers who have further questions are welcome to contact Pet Supplies Plus Neighbor Service team at 734-793-6564 between Monday and Friday 9 am to 4 pm ET (excluding holidays).

 

Pet Supplies Plus Recalls Pig Ears Dog Treats in 33 States

FDA Investigates Contaminated Pig Ear Pet Treats Connected to Human Salmonella Infections

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

© 2019. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

RECALL: Thogersen Family Farm Pet Food

On April 4th, the Thogersen Family Farm (Stanwood WA) issued a voluntary recall for some of their frozen raw pet food.

The recall was issued after samples collected by the Washington State Department of Agriculture tested positive for listeria contamination.

There have been no reports of illness to date.

The Recall: The Affected Products

The products are frozen in 2-pound flattened, rectangular clear plastic packages.

Recalled varieties include frozen, raw:

  • Coarse ground rabbit
  • Coarse ground mallard duck
  • Ground llama
  • Ground pork

According to the FDA’s recall notice, Recalled product labels did not contain any lot identification, batch codes, or expiration dates. The front of the package contains one large white square label with the company name, product type and weight.”

These products were sold to individual customers or two retail establishments which have been notified of the recall.

 

What You Should Know About Listeria Monocytogenes

Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans (if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product). Pets infected with listeria may display symptoms including:

  • Mild to severe diarrhea;
  • Anorexia;
  • Fever;
  • Nervous, muscular and respiratory system issues;
  • Abortion;
  • Depression; and
  • Shock and even death.

Infected animals can also serve as sources of infection to other household animals and humans.

 

What to do Next

Consumers should stop feeding any of the affected products and call the company with any questions at 360-929-9808.

 

Pet Age: Thogersen Family Farm Disputes FDA Recall

Sources: The Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 

 

© 2019. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

RECALL: Nestlé Purina PetCare: Muse Wet Cat Food

While Cold Noses News typically focuses on all things canine, we do have a huge soft spot for our felines, especially when it comes to protecting their life and health.

After complaints from cat owners, Nestlé Purina PetCare Company has voluntarily recalled limited amounts of their Muse wet cat food.

The recall was issued after cat owners found pieces of rubber in the cat food. These pieces of rubber were translucent yellow with a blue backing and could pose a potential choking hazard.Purina's Muse Natural Chicken Recipe Wet Cat Food has been recalled

The recall only impacts Muse wet cat food, Natural ChickenRecipe in Gravy, in 3-ounce cans.

There have been no reports of injury or illness to date.

 

The Recall: The Affected Lots

UPC Codes Best by date Lot identification number
38100 17199
(single three-ounce can)
4/30/2020
4/30/2020
8094116209
8094116210
38100 17780
(from Muse 6-can variety pack)
4/30/2020 8094179001

These products were distributed nationwide at pet specialty and e-commerce retailers.

Purina Muse Wet Cat Food recalled Purina Muse Wet Cat Food Recall

 

What to do Next

Consumers should throw away any of the recalled product and reach out to the Company for assistance at 800-982-3885.

 

Sources: The Truth about Pet Food and the FDA.

 


© 2019. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

RECALL: Darwin’s Natural Dog Food (What You Need to Know)

Yesterday, on March 26th, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning to dog owners to avoid feeding 3 separate lots of Darwin’s Natural Raw Dog Food.

(NOTE: All 3 lots were manufactured in October/November of 2018.)

After a consumer complaint, the FDA collected and tested samples from 3 lots and all tested positive for salmonella.

Darwin's Pet Food

These frozen dog food products are manufactured by Arrow  Reliance Inc., doing business as Darwin’s Natural Pet Products. Products are sold online direct to consumers.

UPDATE: The company just issued a public response to the FDA’s warning; it can be read here

 

The Recall: The Affected Products/Lots:

Darwin’s Natural Pet Products Natural Selections Chicken Recipe with Organic Vegetables for Dogs
Package: 5309(11)181019
Manufacture Date: October 19, 2018

Darwin’s Natural Pet Products Natural Selections Chicken Recipe with Organic Vegetables for Dogs
Package: 5375(11)181106
Manufacture Date: November 11, 2018

Darwin’s Natural Pet Products Natural Selections Turkey Recipe with Organic Vegetables for Dogs
Package: 5339(11)181026
Manufacture Date: October 26, 2018

 

What You Should Know About Salmonella

Salmonella poses a risk to animals ingesting the affected product (including dogs and cats) and can also be transmitted to humans. Pets infected with salmonella may display symptoms including:

  • Fever;
  • Lethargy and shock;
  • Diarrhea (which may last up to 3-4 weeks or longer);
  • Vomiting;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Dehydration; and
  • Mucus and/or blood in stool.

People infected with salmonella can also have:

  • Diarrhea;
  • Fever; and
  • Abdominal cramps.

For some people, their diarrhea may be severe enough to require hospitalization.

What to do Next

Consumers should contact their veterinarian if their dogs have consumed any of these recalled products and are exhibiting any of the symptoms listed above.  Also, contact your own doctor if you are feeling any symptoms of salmonella.

The affected product should be thrown away immediately.

Consumers should thoroughly wash their hands after handling any affected products or cleaning any potentially contaminated surfaces including freezers/refrigerators where the product was stored, bowls, utensils, bedding, toys and floors.

 

Sources: The Truth about Pet Food, the Dog Food Advisor and the FDA.

 


© 2019. Cold Noses News. All Rights Reserved. Content may be shared with proper credit and link back to Cold Noses News.


 

RECALL: Hill’s Pet Food Recall Is Expanded

 

Hill’s Pet Nutrition (of Topeka, KS) expanded its voluntary recall of January 31st to include canned dog food products due to the presence of elevated levels of Vitamin D.  Specific lots of Prescription Diet and Science Diet dog foods are included in the expanded recall and were distributed to both retail pet stores and veterinary clinics throughout the U.S.

According to Hill’s, no dry foods, cat foods or treats are affected by these recalls.

Why the Recall

Hill’s originally received “a complaint in the United States about a dog exhibiting signs of elevated Vitamin D levels.” The recall was expanded after a detailed review isolated the issue to a vitamin premix from an American supplier.

The Recall: What Products and What’s Being Done

For a complete list of recalled products (including both the January 31st and March 20th recalls), click here.

According to an email sent to veterinarians on March 20th, Hill’s Pet Nutrition has:

  1. Expanded the availability of their consumer call center to 7 days a week (800-445-5777).
  2. Promised to begin collection of affected products from stores, clinics and shelters beginning March 21st.
  3. Promised to pay for:
    1. Diagnostic screening for Hypervitaminosis D for any pet who has consumed the recalled food;
    2. Continued diagnostic testing and medical treatment for affected pets until they are back to normal.

What You Should Know About Elevated Levels of Vitamin D

Dogs who eat elevated levels of Vitamin D may exhibit the following symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased thirst
  • Increased urination
  • Excessive drooling
  • Weight loss

When consumed at very high levels, dogs can face serious health issues (including potentially life-threatening) including renal (kidney) dysfunction.

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately contact their veterinarian if their dogs have consumed this recalled product and are exhibiting the symptoms listed above.

The affected product should be thrown away immediately or returned to the purchase place for a full refund (unopened products only).

Consumers with any questions should contact Hill’s Pet Nutrition (Consumer Affairs) at 800-445-5777 (Every Day from 7am-7pm CST) or via email at ContactUs@HillsPet.com for more information.

 

Sources: Truth About Pet Food and the Dog Food Advisor.

RECALLS: A Look at 10 Years of Pet Food Recalls

An in-depth look by Susan Thixton of TruthAboutPetFood.com at the past ten years of Pet Food and Treat recalls and what we can learn.

A Decade of Recalls

During the past ten years (January 1, 2009 to November 4, 2018) did you know there’s been 173 pet food recalls posted on the FDA website?

BUT wait; that’s NOT the whole story!

Those 173 recalls represents the number of recall Press Releases issued, NOT the total number of actual pet foods recalled. In addition, some recalls count as “one” recall even though multiple products may actually be involved in the “one” recall.

The Recalls: What’s Actually Included?

The recalls over the past ten years have included the following categories:

  • 59 Treat Recalls
  • 48 Raw Recalls
  • 45 Kibble Recalls
  • 17 Canned Recalls
  • 3 Dehydrated Recalls
  • 1 Cooked, Sold Frozen Pet Food

What Should YOU do Next?

Education is the best defense in keeping your pets safe and healthy.

Learn more about the last decade of recalls at TruthAboutPetFood.com.  Learn about the specific causes for the recalls and which ones pose the greatest risk for your pet. (Hint: Salmonella, Listeria and E.coli rank at #1.)

Did you know that some causes behind the recalls even pose health risks to YOU, the pet owner?! (Including infants and children 5 years and younger; adults aged 65 and older; AND people with weakened immune systems.)

Your Dog Depends On You To Protect Him!Your Cat Depends on You To Protect Her!

 

Remember, your pet is depending on you to be his advocate and educated consumer!

What you don’t know can hurt your beloved pet!

 

 

(Again, we thank Susan Thixton for this in-depth expose about what we can learn from the past ten years of Pet Food and Treat recalls.)

 

Source: Truth About Pet Food.

RECALL: Nutrisca Dry Dog Food

Nutrisca (St Louis, MO) is voluntarily recalling one formula of their dry dog food (Chicken and Chickpea). The recall was issued due to the presence of elevated levels of Vitamin D. (Note: The company also issued another recall for their Natural Life Chicken & Potato Dry Dog Food.)  

Why the Recall

The recall was issued after an investigation of complaints from 3 pet owners for Vitamin D toxicity after consumption. The investigation revealed a formulation error led to the elevated levels.

The Recall: What and Where

The recall specifically involves:

4 lbs Nutrisca® Chicken and Chickpea Dry Dog Food Bag UPC: 8-84244-12495-7
15 lbs Nutrisca® Chicken and Chickpea Dry Dog Food Bag UPC: 8-84244-12795-8
28 lbs Nutrisca® Chicken and Chickpea Dry Dog Food Bag UPC: 8-84244-12895-5

(Note: Nutrisca Chicken & Chickpea wet dog foods are not impacted by this recall.)

A Best By Date of February 25, 2020 – September 13, 2020 is found on the back or bottom of the bag.

The recalled product was distributed to retail nationwide.

What You Should Know About Elevated Levels of Vitamin D

Dogs who eat elevated levels of Vitamin D may exhibit the following symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased thirst
  • Increased urination
  • Excessive drooling
  • Weight loss

When consumed at very high levels, dogs can face serious health issues including renal dysfunction.

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately contact their veterinarian if their dogs have consumed this recalled product and are exhibiting the symptoms listed above.

The affected product should be thrown away or returned to the purchase place for a full refund.

Consumers with any questions should contact Natural Life Pet Products at 888-279-9420 (Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm CST) or via email at ConsumerServices@Nutrisca.com for more information.

 

Sources: Truth About Pet Food and the FDA.

RECALL: Natural Life Dry Dog Food

Natural Life Pet Products (St Louis, MO) is voluntarily recalling its Chicken & Potato dry dog food in 17.5 lb bags.  The recall was issued for the presence of elevated levels of Vitamin D.

Why the Recall

The recall was issued after an investigation of complaints from 3 pet owners for Vitamin D toxicity after consumption. The investigation revealed a formulation error led to the elevated levels.

The Recall: What and Where

The recall specifically involves:

  • The 17.5 lbs Natural Life Chicken & Potato Dry Dog Food
  • A bag UPC of 0-12344-08175-1
  • A Best By Date of May 29, 2020 – August 10, 2020 (found on the back or bottom of the bag)

The recalled dog food was distributed to retail stores in:

  • Alabama
  • California
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • North and South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia

What You Should Know About Elevated Levels of Vitamin D

Dogs who eat elevated levels of Vitamin D may exhibit the following symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased thirst
  • Increased urination
  • Excessive drooling
  • Weight loss

When consumed at very high levels, dogs can face serious health issues including renal dysfunction.

What to do Next

Consumers should immediately contact their veterinarian if their dogs have consumed this recalled product and are exhibiting the symptoms listed above.

The affected product should be thrown away or returned to the purchase place for a full refund.

Consumers with any questions should contact Natural Life Pet Products at 888-279-9420 (Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm CST) or via email at ConsumerServices@Nutrisca.com for more information.

 

Sources: Truth About Pet Food and the FDA.

RECALL: Performance Dog Frozen Raw Pet Food

Bravo Packing, Inc. (of Carneys Point, NJ) has issued a voluntary recall for two  products: Performance Dog in the 2-lb and 5-lb plastic sleeves. The recall was issued for potential salmonella contamination.

Why the Recall

The recall was initiated after an FDA inspection collected and tested a sample which tested positive for salmonella. No human or animal illness has been reported to date.

The recall specifically involves:

Performance Dog Frozen Raw Pet Food in 2-pound and 5-pound plastic sleeves with the Manufacture Date Code of 071418. (This code is printed on the cardboard boxes containing the plastic sleeves, NOT on the individual sleeves. There are NO unique ID numbers of the sleeves.)

If customers purchased either of these recalled products after July 14, 2018, the FDA recommends throwing the product away to protect the health of your dog and yourself from potential contamination from salmonella.

Note: Performance Dog typically works with Tefco, a Brooklyn, NYC distributor which fulfills orders to brick-and-mortar retail stores and to consumers directly.


Product label, Bravo Performance Dog


What You Should Know About Salmonella

Salmonella poses a risk to animals ingesting the affected product (including dogs and cats) and can also be transmitted to humans. Pets infected with salmonella may display symptoms including:

  • Fever;
  • Lethargy and shock;
  • Diarrhea (which may last up to 3-4 weeks or longer);
  • Vomiting;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Dehydration; and
  • Mucus in stool.

What to do Next

Consumers with any questions should contact Bravo Packing, Inc., at 856-299-1044 (Monday-Friday, 6am-2pm EST or Saturday, 4am-9am EST) or via their website at http://www.BravoPacking.com.

 

Sources: Dog Food AdvisorFDA Website and Truth About Pet Food.

RECALL: Steve’s Real Food

Steve’s Real Food  (of Salt Lake City, UT) issued a voluntary recall on September 7th for 3 separate product lots: Turducken Recipe dog food (5-lb bags), Quest Emu Diet cat food and Quest Beef Diet cat food (both in 2-lb bags) for potential salmonella or listeria contamination.

Why the Recall

The recall was initiated after a  routine sampling by the Washington Department of Agriculture positively revealed the presence of the bacteria. Subsequent testing by the Company resulted in negative results for both salmonella and listeria. No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall specifically involves:

 



What You Should Know About Salmonella

Salmonella poses a risk to animals ingesting the affected product (including dogs and cats) and can also be transmitted to humans. Pets infected with salmonella may display symptoms including:

  • Fever;
  • Lethargy and shock;
  • Diarrhea (which may last up to 3-4 weeks or longer);
  • Vomiting;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Dehydration; and
  • Mucus in stool.

What You Should Know About Listeria Monocytogenes

Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans (if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product). Pets infected with listeria may display symptoms including:

  • Mild to severe diarrhea;
  • Anorexia;
  • Fever;
  • Nervous, muscular and respiratory system issues;
  • Abortion;
  • Depression; and
  • Shock and even death.

Infected animals can also serve as sources of infection to other household animals and humans.

What to do Next

Consumers with any of the recalled products should immediately return it to their retailer, where it was purchased, for a full refund. Consumers with questions can contact Steve’s Real Food at 888-526-1900 (Monday-Friday: 9am-4pm Mountain).

 

Source: FDA: Steve’s Real Food Recall 

RECALL: G & C Raw

G & C Raw, LLC (of Versailles, OH) issued a recall on August 6th for two of their products, 1-lb containers of Pat’s Cat Turkey Cat Food and 2-lb containers of Ground Lamb Dog Food for potential Listeria contamination.

Why the Recall

The recall was initiated after a  routine sampling by the Ohio Department of Agriculture revealed the presence of the bacteria. No illnesses have been reported to date.

The affected products are not being produced or distributed until the investigation has been completed and the source of the problem identified.

The recall specifically involves:

  • PAT’S CAT TURKEY CAT FOOD
    • (30) 1-lb clear plastic containers
    • Lot #WWPKTF051618
    • Distributed in OH, MI, IN, PAN, KY, NC and GA through direct delivery
  • GROUND LAMB DOG FOOD
    • (40) 2-lb plastic container
    • Lot #MFF022718
    • Distributed in OH, MI, IN, PAN, KY, NC and GA through direct delivery


What You Should Know About Listeria Monocytogenes

Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans (if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product). Pets infected with listeria may display symptoms including:

  • Mild to severe diarrhea;
  • Anorexia;
  • Fever
  • Nervous, muscular and respiratory system issues;
  • Abortion;
  • Depression; and
  • Shock and even death.

Infected animals can also serve as sources of infection to other household animals and humans.

What to do Next

Consumers with any of the recalled products should immediately return it to G & C Raw, 225 N. West Street, Versailles, OH for a full refund. Consumers with questions can contact the company at 937-827-0010 (Eastern) or by email at GCRawDogFood@yahoo.com.

 

Source: Truth About Pet Food: G & C Recall, August, 2018 and FDA: G & C Raw, LLC Recall

RECALL: Dave’s Pet Food

Dave’s Pet Food (Agawam, MA) has issued a voluntary recall (in cooperation with the FDA) of a single lot of their 95% Premium Beef dog food cans.

Why the Recall

The recall was initiated by Dave’s Pet Food after the FDA analyzed one lot of the product and it was found to have elevated levels of thyroid hormone. The analysis was conducted by the FDA “after receiving a complaint that four dogs consuming it were found to have low Free T4 (fT4) and Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH).”

The product was distributed along the East Coast of the USA and sold in pet stores and e-commerce websites. No other products (or other products manufactured by Dave’s Pet Food) are impacted.

The recall involves:

  • A single batch (of 548 cases);
  • The 13 oz., 95% Premium Beef canned dog food;
  • The UPC Code: 85038-11167; and
  • A Date Code: 08/2020.

What You Should Know About Beef Thyroid

Elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone (which occurs naturally), may cause the following symptoms in dogs:

  • Increased Thirst & Urination;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Increased Heart Rate; and
  • Restlessness.

If high levels are consumed over an extended period of time, symptoms may increase in severity and include vomiting, diarrhea and rapid or labored breathing. If your dog has consumed any of these recalled products and is showing the symptoms listed above, immediately discontinue feeding the treat and contact your vet.

What to do Next

Consumers with any of the recalled products should immediately stop feeding it to their dogs. Consumers may receive a refund or coupon for replacement product by contacting Dave’s Pet Food at 888-763-2738 (between 9-5pm EST Monday through Friday).

 

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

Source: Dave’s Dog Food Recall, June 2018

RECALL: Merrick Beef Dog Treats

Merrick Pet Care (Amarillo, TX) has issued a voluntary recall of five production codes of their beef treat products. The recalled products include: Prime Patties Real Beef Recipe, Sausage Cuts Real Beef Recipe, Real Beef Jerky, Real Beef Sausage Cuts and Real Steak Patties.

Why the Recall

The recall was initiated by Merrick after the FDA shared a consumer complaint of their dog’s health being temporarily impacted after eating Merrick Backcountry Great Plains Real Beef Jerky, 4.5 oz. The dog fully recovered after the treat was no longer fed.

According to a press release from Merrick, “we have not received any similar reports to date from consumers about issues with these products.”

These treats are distributed in the United States through pet speciality, grocery and online retailers with limited distribution in Canada.

The limited recall includes only the production codes listed below (production codes are listed on the lower back of treat bags):

What You Should Know About Beef Thyroid

Elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone (which occurs naturally), may cause the following symptoms in dogs:

  • Increased Thirst & Urination;
  • Weight Loss;
  • Increased Heart Rate; and
  • Restlessness.

If high levels are consumed over an extended period of time, symptoms may increase in severity and include vomiting, diarrhea and rapid or labored breathing. If your dog has consumed any of these recalled products and is showing the symptoms listed above, immediately discontinue feeding the treat and contact your vet.

What to do Next

Consumers with any of the recalled products may receive a refund by:

 

Source: Merrick Pet Care Beef Dog Treats Recall

RECALLS: The Dog Food Recalls Continue …

Recent recalls include products made by:

  • K9 Natural
  • Vital Essentials
  • OC Raw Dog

Below are the latest recalls since our last blog post.

 


K9 Natural Ltd

On April 13th, K9 Natural Ltd of New Zealand voluntarily recalled four batches of its K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast (the 2.2 and 11lb bags) that were imported to the United States in June 2017. The recall was issued due to potential Listeria monocytogenes.

The recall involves:

K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast (2.2 lb bags):

Shipped to distributors/pet speciality retail stores in WA, CA, TX and CO with the batch #170517 and an expiration date of 17NOV2018.

K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast (11 lb bags):

Shipped to distributors/pet speciality retail stores in WA, CA, TX, CO and PA with the following batch numbers:

  • #150517 (expiration date of 15NOV2018)
  • #160517 (expiration date of 16NOV2018)
  • #170517 (expiration date of 17NOV2018)

There have been no reports of illness.

Customers with questions may contact the company via phone at 1 888 345 4680, M-F 8am-5pm PST & EST and S-S 14 &15 April 2018 8am-5pm PST & EST or email info@k9natural.com.

Click here to learn more about the K9 Natural recall.

 


 

Vital Essentials

For the third time,  another recall was issued on two Vital Essentials products: Vital Essentials Freeze-Dried Beef Toppers and Vital Essentials Frozen Beef Chub Entree for Dogs due to potential Salmonella contamination.

Salmonella can infect both dogs, cats and humans.

The recalled products can be identified with the following information:

 

Vital Essentials Freeze-Dried Beef Toppers: Lot #13815, Best by 06/04/19

Vital Essentials Frozen Beef Chub Entrée: 5 lb., Lot #13816, Best by 12/27/18

Customers may notify their retailer for a replacement or refund or contact the company at 920-370-6542.

Click here to learn more about the Vital Essentials recall.


OC Raw Dog

OC Raw Dog of Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, issued a voluntary recall of approximately 1,560 lbs of their Chicken, Fish & Produce Raw Frozen Canine Formulation due to potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

The affected products were manufactured on October 11, 2017 with a Lot number of 3652 and a Use By Date of October 11, 2018.

The recalled Lot #3652 was shipped and sold to Independent Speciality Retailers in the following states: CA, CO, FL, MD, MN, PA and VT.

Click here to read more about the OC Raw Dog recall. 

NOTE: Another recall was also issued by OC Raw Dog for its Freeze-dried Sardines because the product exceeded FDA size restrictions (of 5 inches). (The FDA has determined that salt-cured, dried or fermented un-eviscerated fish larger than 5 inches have been linked to outbreaks of botulism poisoning between 1981 and 1987 and then again in 1991.)

Click here to read more about the OC Raw Dog recall for Freeze-dried Sardines. 

 


 

We try our best to keep our readers informed with the latest recall information (here on our blog and on our Twitter/Facebook pages); unfortunately that’s not always possible. To stay informed with the latest recalls, subscribe to one (we recommend all) of the recall alerts below.

Your pet is counting on you.

Dog Food Advisor

Truth About Pet Food 

American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMA)

US Food & Drug Administration (FDA)

RECALLS: What You MUST Know

(Note: We’ve been trying to publish this post since February. But with the constant barrage of recalls, it’s been almost impossible to stay up-to-date with all the information.)

The last few months have been nothing short of frightening when it comes to recalls and our beloved pets. Unfortunately, we’ve all become a bit immune to seeing recall announcements here and there. But as the few months have clearly shown, recalls are on the rise particularly with the bacterial contamination of Salmonella which can infect dogs, cats and humans.

 

Recent recalls include products made by:

  • J.M. Smucker Company: Gravy Train, Kibbles ‘N Bits, Ol’ Roy & Skippy
  • Northwest Naturals
  • Vital Essentials
  • TruPet
  • Smokehouse Pet Products
  • Redbarn Pet Products
  • Raws for Paws
  • Darwin’s Natural Pet Products
  • Blue Ridge Beef
  • J.M. Smucker Company: Milo’s Kitchen Dog Treats
  • Blue Buffalo Company
  • Radagast Pet Food
  • Steve’s Real Food
  • Raw Basics
  • An Update on the Deadly Chinese Jerky Treats

 

Keep reading to learn more about each recall.


J.M. Smucker (Dogs & Cats)

In early February, traces of pentobarbital (a drug used to euthanize cats, dogs and horses) were found in Gravy Train canned dog food. The findings came out of an  ABC station’s investigation (WJLA in Washington, DC). The investigation found pentobarbital in 9 out of 15 cans (or 60%) of Gravy Train dog food. Over months of testing and re-testing, WJLA News tested a total of 62 samples of dog food.

Sourcing meat for pet food from a “diseased animal or an animal that has died otherwise than by slaughter” is a direct violation of federal law (Section 342(a)).

The Smucker Company (Orrvile, OH) later expanded the recall to include certain lots of Gravy Train, Kibbles ‘N Bits, Ol’ Roy and Skippy wet dog food products.

 Click here to learn more about the original recall and the affected SKUs/UPC codes.

(UPDATE: A day after the story broke on February 8th, a class action lawsuit was filed against Big Heart Brands Gravy Train for advertising, misrepresenting and selling contaminated dog foods.)

(NOTE: J.M. Smucker also recalled certain lots of canned cat food in January. Click here to learn more about this limited voluntary recall.)


Northwest Naturals

Near the end of February, Northwest Naturals of Portland Oregon, issued a recall for its 5lb frozen Chicken and Salmon pet food chubs (sealed plastic tubes) due to potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

While no pet or human illnesses were reported, Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product.

Click here to learn more about this recall.

 


Vital Essentials

Again at the end of February, Carnivore Meat Company of Green Bay, WI, recalled 73 cases of Vital Essentials Freeze-Dried Beef Nibblets Entree for Dogs pet food due to potential Salmonella contamination.

The affected product was distributed through both independent and online retailers, Chewys.com and Amazon.com. Salmonella can infect both dogs, cats and humans. The contamination was found following the Michigan Department of Agriculture’s collection of a single batch, retail sample that tested positive. There have been no reports of illness.

Click here to learn more about the Vital Essentials recall.

 


 

TruPet

Another recall during the last week of February included a limited recall from TruPet of Milford, OH, for their “Treat Me Crunchy Beef Delight” 2.5 oz pet treats due to possible Salmonella contamination.

Click here to learn more about the TruPet/TruDog treat recall.

 

 


Smokehouse Pet Products

 

On February 19th, the FDA announced a recall of Beefy Munchies dog treats by Smokehouse Pet Products of Sun Valley, CA.  The recall included all sizes and package types (including individual bags, resealable bags and plastic tubs (labeled “Beefy Bites”) due to possible Salmonella contamination.

The recall was issued after routine sampling and testing by the Colorado Department of Agriculture revealed Salmonella in two 4-oz packages.

Click here to read more about the Smokehouse Pet Products Beefy Munchies recall. 

 


Redbarn Pet Products

In early March, Redbarn Pet Products of Long Beach, CA, expanded its original recall (of February 9th) to include all lots of their Bully Sticks under the brand names of Chewy Louie, Dentley’s and Good Lovin’.

The presence of Salmonella was revealed through testing by the Colorado Department of Agriculture. The investigation led to a raw ingredient from a single supplier as the source. The affected products were distributed in pet speciality and grocery retail stores nationwide.

Click here to learn more about the recall and click here to view all 25 recalled products and their images.

 


Raws for Paws

In early February, approximately 4,000 pounds of Ground Turkey Pet food were recalled by Raws for Paws of Minneapolis, MN because of the potential presence of Salmonella.

Both the 1- and 5-pound chubs (sealed plastic tubes) were including in the recall. The affected product was distributed throughout Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and through online mail orders.

Two illnesses were reported in connection with this recall. The recall was issued after testing by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture returned positive results.

Click here to learn more about the Raws for Paws recall of Ground Turkey Pet Food. 

 


Darwin’s Natural Pet Products

Another early February recall involved two Darwin’s Pet Food products (of Tukwila WA):

  • ZooLogics Chicken Meals with Organic Vegetables for Dogs; and
  • ZooLogics Turkey with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs.

Testing revealed the presence of Salmonella. According to Gary Tashjian, the Founder of Darwin’s Pet Products, customers who received these meals were notified directly. Darwin’s Natural Pet Products are sold exclusively through a subscription service directly to their customers.

Just a few days ago, the recall was expanded to include a total of four lots of products. The following products were also added to the recall with the potential of Salmonella and E. Coli (0128):

  • Natural Selections Chicken with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs; and
  • Natural Selections Duck with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs.

Click here to learn more about the expanded recall of Darwin’s Pet Food products.

 


Blue Ridge Beef (Dogs & Kittens)

Front Chub package BRB Complete; Back of Chub package with Nutrition InformationAgain, just a few days ago, another recall was issued, this time for Blue Ridge Beef (BRB) of Eatonton, GA. The recall involves one lot of its BRB Complete Raw pet food because of the potential presence of both Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. The affected product is sold in 2-pound chubs (sealed plastic tubes) and are frozen. The recall only affects the following states:

  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • North and South Carolina
  • Tennessee

The contamination was revealed after samples were collected and tested by the FDA.

To learn more about the Blue Ridge Beef recall, click here.

NOTE: On March 2nd, Blue Ridge Beef also issued a recall for one lot of their Kitten Grind Raw Pet Food again for the potential contamination of both Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Click here to learn more about this recall.

 


J.M. Smucker Company (Milo’s Kitchen Dog Treats)

Just a few days again, the J.M. Smucker Company issued another recall for two specific lots of Milo’s Kitchen dog treats. The treats potentially contain elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone. Dogs ingesting elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone may exhibit symptoms like increased thirst and urination, weight loss, increased heart rate and restlessness. While these symptoms may resolve themselves once the affected product is no longer fed, prolonged consumption can result in serious vomiting, diarrhea and rapid and/or labored breathing. 

Click here to learn more about the recall and the affected UPC codes.

 


Blue Buffalo Company

Earlier this month, Blue Buffalo (Wilton, CT) issued a recall of one lot of its BLUE Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs because of the possibility of elevated levels of beef thyroid hormones.

Dogs ingesting elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone may exhibit symptoms like increased thirst and urination, weight loss, increased heart rate and restlessness. While these symptoms may resolve themselves once the affected product is no longer fed, prolonged consumption can result in serious vomiting, diarrhea and rapid and/or labored breathing. 

NOTE: Blue Buffalo Pet Food was recently purchased by General Mills (the makers of Cheerios, Haagen-Dazs, Betty Crocker, Pillsbury and Old El Paso.

Click here to read more about the Blue Buffalo recall. 

 


Radagast Pet Food (Cats)

UPDATE: Radagast Pet is expanding their original recall to all varieties of Rad Cat Raw Diet due to potential listeria contamination.

Click here to learn more about the latest, expanded recall and the affected lot numbers.

The Portland, OR company, Radagast Pet Food, Inc., is recalling two lots of their products as of March 20th due to the potential of Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

The two recipes being recalled include:

  • Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Chicken; and
  • Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Turkey.

Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk to both animals ingesting the affected product and humans if they do not thoroughly wash their hands after coming into contact with a contaminated product.

Click here to learn more about the Radagast Cat Food recall and the two lots affected.

 


Steve’s Real Food

Earlier this month, Steve’s Real Food (Cottonwood, UT) issued a recall for its Raw Frozen Dog Food Turkey Canine Recipe after testing positive for Salmonella.

The affected lot (52 cases) involved their frozen 5-pound bags of turkey nuggets. They were distributed to retail pet food stores in the following states:

 

 

  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Florida
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • North Dakota
  • Nebraska
  • New Jersey
  • Nevada
  • New York
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • Washington

To learn more about the Steve’s Real Food recall, click here.


Raw Basics

Another frozen raw pet food issued a recall on March 6th. Raw Basics of Pleasant Prairie, WI, recalled its 5-pound boxes of Tucker’s Raw Frozen Pork-Bison Dog Food for potential Salmonella contamination.

The presence of Salmonella was revealed after testing done by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture. The contamination was isolated to one lot of 108 boxes (540 pounds) and distributed to pet specialty retail stores in Minnesota, Georgia, Kansas and Pennsylvania.

Click here to learn more about the Raw Basics recall.

 


An Update on the Deadly Chinese Jerky Treats

It’s happened again, this time in Oklahoma with a 4-year-old Yorkie.

Within hours of eating of chicken jerky dog treats with “all natural farm fresh ingredients” sourced from China, Zoe was dead.

It’s been over 11 years since imported food and treats from China have been harming – and even killing – our pets. Yet the treats still sit on store shelves for unsuspecting customers to buy and feed to their pets.

If you thought someone is looking out and protecting both you and your beloved pets, think again. If you’re looking for obvious information and disclosures about the treats you buy, think again too.

Read ALL the print, especially the tiny print buried on the back of the package (as illustrated below with the treats that killed Zoe, sold at Walmart).

With no answers from the FDA’s years-long investigative research, but with pets still being sickened and dying, become your own best advocate and learn all you can about what you feed your pet. Until safety takes precedent over profits, your pet’s health is in potential danger.

Click here to read more about unsafe Chinese jerky treats.

Click here to read Zoe’s story.

 


 

We try our best to keep our readers informed with the latest recall information (here on our blog and on our Twitter/Facebook pages); unfortunately that’s not always possible. To stay informed with the latest recalls, subscribe to one (we recommend all) of the recall alerts below.

Your pet is counting on you.

Dog Food Advisor

Truth About Pet Food 

American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMA)

US Food & Drug Administration (FDA)

RECALL: Just Food for Dogs

Just Food for Dogs has issued their first-ever recall after a report from a customer of vomiting and diarrhea after her dogs ate their Turducken product.

In a detailed email from Founder, Shawn Buckley, it was confirmed that one batch of Turducken special (made in their West Hollywood kitchen and code dated: WH 11/18/18) did test positive for Listeria. The dogs who were affected were switched to another food and made a full recovery, without veterinarian intervention, within a day.

Why the Recall

The returned Turducken food was tested and subsequently confirmed the presence of Listeria. The source of the contamination has been traced to the human-grade green beans used in the Turducken recipe.

Based on these preliminary results, Just Food for Dogs is voluntarily:

  • Expanding the Turducken recall to all batch dates.
  • Recalling two other recipes containing green beans:
    • Beef & Russet Potato; and
    • Fish & Sweet Potato.
  • Notifying the FDA as the contaminated green beans may also affect the human food supply.

Severe disease from Listeria in dogs is rare. In fact, Listeria is of more concern to humans. Healthy dogs may experience no signs from listeria contamination, but elderly or weakened dogs may experience vomiting and/or diarrhea.

What to do Next

Consumers are urged to properly dispose of any affected product.

Consumers may also email (support@JustFoodForDogs.com) or call (866-726-9509) Just Food for Dogs for an immediate refund. Shawn Buckley can be reached directly at shawnb@JustFoodForDogs.com or 949-378-2927.

 

Source: Truth About Pet Food: Just Food for Dogs Pet Food Recall.

Please Help Us Help Others.

The holidays are a wonderful time for most of us. Families come together and create new, happy memories, eat lots of wonderful food and eagerly open presents.

But for many people, the winter season can be a difficult time trying to stay warm and still have enough food to eat for not only themselves and their children, but also for their furry family members.

Please support your local pantries to help those in need. The simpliest things can mean the most to those who need help. And let us know about the pet pantries in your area so we can add them to our website to help even more people this holiday season.

Email us directly at Bobbie@ColdNosesNews.com, click on the images to email us or leave a message below.

Thank you and Happy Holidays everyone!

RECALL: Loving Pets Air-Puffed Dog Treats

Loving Pets, a New Jersey-based manufacturer of pet treats located in Cranbury, is voluntarily recalling a limited number of dog treats for potential salmonella contamination.

The limited recall includes the following products:

  • Loving Pets Barksters: Sweet Potato and Chicken and Brown Rice and Chicken;
  • Loving Pets Puffsters Snack Chips: Apple and Chicken, Banana and Chicken, Sweet Potato and Chicken and Cranberry and Chicken;
  • Whole Hearted: Chicken and Apple Puff Treats.

(For the specific Item, UPC and Lot numbers of the affected products, click here to go to the Loving Pets Products website.)

Salmonella and the Risks

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is also a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having come into contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. Symptoms of possible salmonella poisoning in humans include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. While rare, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Pets poisoned with Salmonella may exhibit lethargy, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may only show signs of decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers of salmonella and infect other animals or humans.

Contact your vet or doctor if you suspect salmonella poisoning for immediate help.

Why the Recall

The potential salmonella contamination was “discovered by the Loving Pet’s internal quality assurance team.”  The contamination was identified to a single finished ingredient supplied to Loving Pets from one of its USA-based suppliers.

According to a Press Release:

“Loving Pets produces its treats in small batches, in order to offer the highest quality and control in safety. To ensure the safety of its products, Loving Pets decided to be extra cautious and recall a wider range of lot numbers so that no possible contaminated product is available on the market.”

According to the Company’s website, no illnesses, injuries or complaints have been reported.

What to do Next

Consumers may return any affected treats to the retailer where the product was originally purchased.

For additional information, consumers may also call Cathy Vesey at 866-599-PETS (7387) or visit LovingPetsProducts.com.


To learn more about the Loving Pets recall, go to:

RECALL: Rawhide Chews: Multiple Brands

Still feeding your dog rawhide chews? Then this recall is for you.

United Pet Group, a division of Spectrum Brands, Inc., is voluntarily recalling multiple brands of packages of rawhide dog chew products (distributed to retail outlets and sold online in the U.S. from their Edwardsville, IL distribution center ) for potential chemical contamination.

All of the recalled dog rawhide chew products have an expiration date ranging from 06/01/2019 through 05/31/2020.

Why the Recall

United Pet Group identified manufacturing facilities (in Mexico and Colombia, as well as a Brazilian supplier), were using a processing aid during manufacturing (a quaternary ammonium compound). While this anti-microbial chemical compound is approved for cleaning food processing equipment, it has not been approved in the U.S. as a processing aid in the manufacturing of rawhide chews for dogs.

There have been very limited reports of pet illness and the primary consumer complaint was the unpleasant smell of affected products. Diarrhea and vomiting were also reported.

Exposure to quaternary ammonium compounds (through direct ingestion) may cause the following symptoms in dogs (depending on the severity, veterinarian treatment may be necesssary):

  • Reduced appetite, and
  • Gastric irritation (including diarrhea and vomiting).

What to do Next

Consumers are urged to properly dispose of any affected product or return it directly to United Pet Group or the retail store for a full refund.

Consumers may also contact the United Pet Group Consumer Affairs Team directly at 855-215-4962 between the hours of 8:00 AM – 11:00 PM Eastern Standard Time with questions or for a refund.

To learn more about the specific brand and product names and associated UPCs involved in this recall, go to:

RECALL: SmallBatch Pets Frozen Pet Food

Smallbatch Pets Inc., of Portland, Oregon, is recalling two specific lots of its frozen bags of 2lb Chicken Blend (for dogs and cats) due to finding salmonella.

The affected products were distributed to retail pet food stores in CA, CO, OR and WA and were sold between February 1st until May 5th, 2017.

The affected lots include:

  • Lot D032
  • UPC: 705105970974
  • Best By Date: 2/1/2018

and:

  • Lot E058
  • UPC: 705105970974
  • Best By Date: 2/27/2018

Salmonella and the Risks

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is also a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having come into contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. Symptoms of possible salmonella poisoning in humans include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. While rare, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Pets poisoned with Salmonella may exhibit lethargy, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may only show signs of decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers of salmonella and infect other animals or humans.

Contact your vet or doctor if you suspect salmonella poisoning for immediate help.

Why the Recall

According to a statement from Michael Vogel of Smallbatch Pets:

“The FDA (under the direction of the CVM) called us and they want us to recall two lots due to finding salmonella. No reported illness to dogs, cats or humans.”

What to do Next

Consumers with these products may return the affected product to the place of purchase for a full refund or contact the company by calling 888-507-2712 or by email at info@SmallBatchPets.com.

To learn more about this recall, go to:

RECALL: Cocolicious Canned Dog Food

Party Animal, Inc., of West Hollywood, CA, is recalling specific lots of two varieties of its Cocolicious Canned Dog Foods because each tested positive for pentobarbital.

Pentobarbital is a drug used to euthanize animals.

The following products are affected by this recall and the company has identified these products were manufactured and distributed in 2015:

  • Cocolicious Beef and Turkey
  • Size: 12 ounce cans
    Lot Number: 0136E15204 04
    Best By Date: July 2019
  • Cocolicious Chicken and Beef
  • Size: 12 ounce cans
    Lot Number: 0134E15 237 13
    Best By Date: August 2019

Why the Recall

According to a statement by Party Animal Pet Foods on their Facebook page:

“On April 13, a retailer in Texas notified us that their customer had presented samples of our Cocolicious Beef and Turkey Lot #0136E15204 04 and Cocolicious Chicken and Beef Lot #0134E15 237 13 to a testing lab (at Texas A&M ), and that the results had tested positive for pentobarbital.”

What to do Next

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 855-727-8926 or by email at info@partyanimalpetfood.com.

To learn more about this recall, go to:

RECALL: Pig Ears for Potential Salmonella

EuroCan Manufacturing of Ontario, Canada, is voluntarily recalling one lot of its Barnsdale Farms® Pig Ears due to the potential presence of Salmonella contamination.

The products were packaged as individually shrink-wrapped packages in quantities of 6, 12 and 25 under the following brands:

  • Barnsdale Farms®
  • Barnsdale Farms Select®
  • Houndstooth®
  • Mac’s Choice®

The recalled products are all from one Lot (#84) and were distributed throughout the United States and Canada.

Salmonella and the Risks

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is also a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having come into contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. Symptoms of possible salmonella poisoning in humans include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. While rare, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Pets poisoned with Salmonella may exhibit lethargy, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may only show signs of decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers of salmonella and infect other animals or humans.

Contact your vet or doctor if you suspect salmonella poisoning for immediate help.

Why the Recalls

While there have been no reports of illness, the company suspended distribution of the affected products while they, along with the FDA, continue to investigate the source of the problem.  Routine testing revealed the presence of Salmonella in the recalled products.

What to do Next

Consumers who purchased any of the recalled pig ear products (Barnsdale Farms®, HoundsTooth® and Mac’s Choice®), should return them to the place of purchase for a refund. Consumers with questions should contact the Company directly at 888-290-7606 (Monday-Friday, from 9am – 5pm EST).

To learn more about this recall and to see images of the recalled products, go to:

RECALLS: Blue Buffalo and Wellness for Dogs

Blue Buffalo Company is voluntarily recalling one lot of BLUE Wilderness® Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs. The recall was issued because of possible elevated levels of naturally-occurring beef thyroid hormones. The recall only involves the 12.5 oz can with the UPC code of 840243101153.

In addition, WellPet issued a voluntary recall of their Wellness Ninety-five Percent Beef Topper for Dogs also for possible elevated levels of naturally-occurring beef thyroid hormones. The recall only affects the 13.2 oz can.

Elevated levels of the naturally-occurring beef thyroid hormone may affect a dog’s metabolism. With prolonged consumption, dogs may exhibit symptoms like increased thirst and urination, increased heart rate, restlessness and weight loss. Over time, symptoms could increase in severity and include vomiting, diarrhea and rapid or difficult breathing. Studies have shown that symptoms typically reverse as soon as the dog stops eating the affected product.

Why the Recalls

While the Blue Buffalo Company did not receive any reports of illness of dogs from consuming this recalled product, the FDA did advise the Company of a single consumer who reported symptoms in one dog. That dog has since fully recovered.

WellPet says there have been no reports of health problems as a result of feeding this recalled product. The voluntary recall was “done out of an abundance of caution.”

What to Do Next

Blue Buffalo Product: Consumers are encouraged to discontinue feeding this product, dispose of it or return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers may email the Company at CustomerCare@BlueBuffalo.com or call them at 877-227-9587.

Wellness Product: Consumers are encouraged to stop feeding this product and email the Company at WeCare@WellPet.com or call them at 866-201-9072.

To learn more about these recalls, go to:

Blue Buffalo Recall:

Wellness Recall:

RECALL: Blue Buffalo/Blue Wilderness Wet Dog Food Cups

Blue Buffalo has issued a voluntary recall of 17 varieties of their wet dog food products in the USA and Puerto Rico.

The “voluntary market withdrawal” (issued on February 28th) includes Blue Divine Delights (3.5 oz cups) and Blue Wilderness Trail Trays (3.5 oz cups).

Why the Recall?

The recall was issued due to a potential quality issue involving the foil seal on the top of the cup. At this time, there are no reports of any dogs becoming ill from the recalled products.

Which Products are Affected?

Below are the 17 recalled products and their respective UPC number.

BLUE Divine Delights Filet Mignon Flavor in Gravy 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312035

BLUE Divine Delights New York Strip Flavor in Gravy 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312037

BLUE Divine Delights Prime Rib Flavor in Gravy 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312039

BLUE Divine Delights Rotisserie Chicken Flavor in Gravy 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312041

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Filet Mignon Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312043

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Porterhouse Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312045

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Grilled Chicken Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312047

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Top Sirloin Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312049

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Angus Beef Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312051

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Roasted Turkey Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312053

BLUE Divine Delights Pate with Bacon, Egg & Cheese 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312057

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Sausage, Egg & Cheese Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312059

BLUE Divine Delights Pate Steak & Egg Flavor 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312061

BLUE Wilderness Trail Trays Duck Grill 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312071

BLUE Wilderness Trail Trays Beef Grill 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312073

BLUE Wilderness Trail Trays Chicken Grill 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312075

BLUE Wilderness Trail Trays Turkey Grill 3.5 oz. Cup

84024312077

What to Do Next

Consumers are encouraged to stop feeding these products and bring any remaining, affected products to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers can also contact the company with any questions at 1-877-870-7363.

Click here to read the entire statement from Blue Buffalo.

 

 

UPDATED: A Pug Story You MUST Read BEFORE You Feed YOUR Dog.

pug-1522653_1280

FEBRUARY 3RD UPDATE: EVANGERS HAS ISSUED A VOLUNTARY RECALL FOR THEIR HUNK OF BEEF CANNED DOG FOOD. READ MORE AT: .


This is Talula’s story.

Once upon a time (not long ago), Talula’s owner served her and her three pug housemates a meal of Evanger’s Hunk of Beef canned dog food. Within 15 minutes, all four dogs were staggering. By the time they arrived at a local veterinary emergency clinic, all four were “limp.” Three dogs eventually recovered after veterinary intensive care treatment (although one now suffers from seizures).

Talula was not so lucky, she passed away.

This disturbing story was reported by NBC4i.com on January 3, 2017. On that very same day, Evangers directed their distributors to remove all Hunk of Beef canned dog food from their store shelves. (The affected product was manufactured in June 2016 with a Lot Number of 1816E06HB13.)

The Test Results

Tests carried out by the Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health (DCPAH) revealed the dog’s stomach contents tested positive for pentobarbital (a drug used to euthanize animals); and the “feed” (pet food) tested positive for pentobarbital.

The lab report stated:

large quantity” of pentobarbital was found – and “If this sample came directly from a can, this is an urgent matter and needs to be reported to the FDA…””

The family posted this image to their Instagram account on January 29, 2017:

BUT WAIT … It’s MORE than an “Evangers” Issue

Maybe you don’t feed your family dogs Evanger’s Hunk of Beef canned dog food; but there’s STILL room for concern. Here’s why:

“Evangers Pet Food manufactures numerous brands of pet food for other pet food companies (co-packs).

Thanks to Lorin Grow of Furry Face Pet Food Store in Redlands, CA –evangers-pet-foods_35612-300x225 Evangers Pet Food has a very unique lot code stamp on their canned foods.

Only Evanger’s stamps their cans on the rollers meaning their stamps are in a semi-circle instead of just straight on the can. If the lot code stamp on your can of pet food is in a semi-circle (as opposed to a straight line) – you can safely assume the pet food was made at Evangers.”

(Source: TruthAboutPetFood.com; picture of an Evangers code stamp provided by one of the readers of Truth About Pet Food)

To learn more, click here to read the full story at TruthAboutPetFood.com.

RECALL: Frozen Blue Ridge Turkey Pet Food

Blue Ridge Beef has issued another voluntary recall; this time for one of its raw, frozen turkey products due to possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

The affected product is sold in 2-lb chubs and can be identified by the manufacturing codes seen in the image below and was sold to retail stores in North Carolina, Florida, South Carolina, and Georgia.

Listeria can adversely affect pets who eat the product and their owners who do not thoroughly wash their hands (or surfaces) after coming into contact with the affected product. (Infected humans will have some – or all – of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. People exhibiting these symptoms should contact their healthcare provider.)

What to Do Next

Consumers are encouraged to immediately stop feeding these products, properly dispose of them or return them to their retailer for a full refund. If pets are displaying any of the symptoms listed above, they should be taken immediately to the vet for proper evaluation and treatment.

Consumers can also email the company at BlueRidgeBeefGA@yahoo.com.

Source: PetMD at https://t.co/dXz6eP4USF.

 

 

RECALL: Frozen Blue Ridge Beef

Blue Ridge Beef is voluntarily recalling two of its frozen products due to potential contamination with salmonella and/or listeria.  The recall includes Beef for Dogs and Kitten Grind and are sold in 2-pound chubs.

Both salmonella and listeria can adversely affect pets who eat the product and their owners who do not thoroughly wash their hands (or surfaces) after coming into contact with the affected product. (Infected humans will have some – or all – of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.)

The recalled frozen products were distributed to retail stores in these states: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and TX.

Why the Recall

The recall was initiated after the FDA received two complaints associated with these products; one involved the illnesses of two kittens and the other complaint involved a puppy death.

Blue Ridge Beef for Dogs      Blue Ridge Kitten Grind

What to Do Next

Consumers are encouraged to immediately stop feeding these products, properly dispose of them or return them to their retailer for a full refund. Consumers can also email the company at BlueRidgeBeefGA@yahoo.com.

To learn more about this recall, the affected Lot and UPC Codes, go to: http://tinyurl.com/hvyd27w.

 

 

Is YOUR Dog’s Breed Prone to Obesity?

Even though the official “National Pet Obesity Awareness Day” has now passed; as responsible dog owners, we all need to remain mindful of the importance of keeping our dogs at a healthy weight (for their breed and age) to give them the best possible health and life.

Is YOUR dog’s breed prone to obesity? Check out the graphic below:

dog-breeds-prone-to-obesity

Want to know more about: identifying whether your dog is overweight? How to proactively prevent K9 obesity and receive a healthy treat recipe you can easily make for your dog?

Just fill out the quick form below for a FREE PDF copy of our October newsletter to be emailed to you.

RECALL: CESAR® Classics Filet Mignon

classic-filet-mignon

Today, Mars Petcare US announced a voluntary recall of a limited number of CESAR® Classics Filet Mignon Flavor product. This includes both individual units, as well as, those offered in flavor variety multi-packs.

Consumers are encouraged to discard any affected product or return it to their retailer for a full refund/exchange.

According to the company, “while a small number of consumers have reported finding the plastic pieces; to date, we have not received any reports of injury or illness associated with the affected product.”

To read more about this recall and for the affected Lot Codes, go to: http://tinyurl.com/zkoeb22.

 

 

 

Dr. Oz to Talk About Pet Food

Dr. Oz Logo

This is some great news to see this addressed in the mainstream media!

This  coming Thursday, September 22nd, the Dr. Oz Show will host a segment entitled, “What’s Really in Your Pet Food and Does It Matter?”

 

Thanks TruthAboutPetFood.com for spreading the word (http://tinyurl.com/jhfmrcr)!

RECALL: Addiction Foods Canned Dog Food

addiction-new_zealand_venison    addiction-new_zealand_brushtail

 

 

 

 

On September 8th, Addiction Foods of Seattle, WA, announced it was doing a recall of two of its canned dog foods; New Zealand Venison & Apples Entree and New Zealand Brushtail & Vegetables Entree.

The voluntary recall was done in response to Addiction’s testing which identified:

  • elevated levels of Vitamin A; and
  • a slight variance in calcium / phosphorous ratios.

The limited quantities of affected product was shipped to select distributors and online retailers between February 11, 2016 and March 19, 2016.

No other Addiction Pet Food products are affected by this recall.

To learn more details about this recall and the specific UPC Codes, Lot Numbers and Expiration Dates, click here to go to the Dog Food Advisory website.

Dog-lovers: Inquiring Minds Want to Know!

At Cold Noses News, we are always working our paws to the bone to figure out how to best Happy-Dog-Pictureserve you, our readers!

So here’s our question: if our K9-exclusive newsletter was offered to you, the dog-lover (not just to business owners), would you be willing to pay a small fee to receive it each month in your inbox? And … what if we told you that each month, in addition to the useful content, there would ALSO be a valuable coupon that would more than cover the monthly cost?

Let us know your opinion in the poll below!

Click here to see our latest issue for August.

RECALL: Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Dog Food

blue-buffalo-life-protection-fish-sweet-potato

 

 

Blue Buffalo Company (Wilton, CT) has voluntarily issued a recall for a select lot of its Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula dog food due to the presence of excessive moisture and mold.

The specifics of the recall are:

  • Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Fish and Sweet Potato Recipe
  • 30 pound bag
  • Best by date: April 11, 2017
  • Batch data: AH 2A 12:08-14:00

According to the company, the recall is limited to a single batch manufactured during a 2-hour period.

Customers can return the affected product to the place of purchase for a full refund.

To read the full recall, click here to go to the Dog Food Advisor.

RECALL: Smallbatch Pets Frozen Dog Sliders

smallbatch-pets-duckbatch-sliders

 

 

 

 

Smallbatch Pets Frozen Dog Food Recall

Just two hours after our recent post about making your own dog treats (due to the increased recalls in dog foods/treats), a new recall came to our attention from the FDA (actually released on March 26th) about Smallbatch Pets Inc. voluntarily recalling one lot of their frozen Duckbatch Sliders (for dogs) due to potential salmonella and listeria.  (Interestingly, there’s nothing posted on the SmallBatch website at the time of writing this post.)

According to the FDA release, “the affected products are sold frozen in 3-pound bags and can be identified with the following manufacturing codes:

  • Lot #CO27
  • UPC #713757339001
  • Best By Date: 01/27/2017

and were distributed to retail pet food stores in California, Colorado, Oregon and Washington.”

According to the FDA release, there have been no pet or consumer illnesses reported from this product at this time. The recall was issued after “routine testing” by the FDA from a sample taken at a distributor. Eighty cases of this specific product lot were sold between the dates of February 23rd through March 10th.

Consumers who touched this contaminated product should thoroughly wash their hands and disinfect any surfaces exposed to this product. Human symptoms from being infected with salmonella and/or listeria include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Infected pets may be lethargic, have a decreased appetite and abdominal pain and also exhibit diarrhea, fever and vomiting.

If you purchased frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders from the affected Lot #CO27, do not feed or touch the product and return to the place of purchase for a full refund or throw them out where your dog, animals or humans cannot reach them.

To read the voluntary recall release in its entirety, go to the FDA Recalls & Safety Alerts Page.

Consumers may also call Smallbatch Pets Inc., at 888-507-2712 or email them at info@smallbatchpets.com.

Dog Food Recall: Purina Beneful and Pro Plan

Purina-Logo


 

 

 



Purina Beneful and Pro Plan Dog Food Recall

The Dog Food Advisor website just announced that Nestle Purina has issued a voluntary recall of the following products due to insufficient vitamins and minerals.

  • Beneful Prepared Meals Wet Dog Food in 10-oz. Tubs
  • Beneful Chopped Blends Wet Dog Food in 10-oz. Tubs
  • Pro Plan Savory Meals Wet Dog Food in 10-oz. Tubs (limited to five varieties)

Purina recommends you discard any of the affected products you may have and contact them for a refund at 1-800-877-7919.

To learn more about this recall,  go to Dog Food Advisor and Purina’s News Center.

To see the full list of recalled products, click here to view the PDF file.

Think someone is looking out for your dog’s food? Think again.

What do You Believe?

Until recently, I had always “assumed” (yes, I know!) that “someone” was looking out for MY dogs and what they were eating. Isn’t thatDog-Food what the never-ending, heartwarming dog food commercials want you to believe?

ESPECIALLY in a nation that has the highest dog population (currently estimated between 70-80 million dogs in the USA according to the ASPCA).

For those of us who consider our canines “family members” (which is almost 67% of us according to the AVMA), the potential realization that no one is really “minding the store” is not only disturbing, but potentially catastrophic! Especially when you understand the full scope of annual pet food sales in just the United States alone (Source: www.statista.com/topics/1369/pet-food/):

  • Dry Dog Food Sales: $9.2B;
  • Wet Dog Food Sales: $2.4B; and
  • Dry Cat Food Sales: $3.8B!

Did you know that “The FDA and USDA does not require mandatory inspections of dog food companies. Quality control is voluntarily enforced.” (ConsumerAffairs.com) Is “voluntary enforcement” really enough for the safety and overall health of your dog? Is “voluntary enforcement” even enough to address just the potential bacteria contamination and mold growth from inconsistent temperature conditions especially with excessive heat and humidity?

When No One is “Minding the Store:” A Real-Life Case Study

Last spring, SeekingAlpha.com reported on complaints from consumers about finding mold in some Freshpet products. The moldy products were reported to be “unexpired and unopened, with no discernible damage to the packaging.” That means that the contamination occurred at the manufacturing facility.  (Click here to learn more about the Freshpet mold contamination including pictures, a map of the affected stores and personal stories from consumers.)

Despite our best efforts, we could not find ANY english-bulldog-538485_640recall(s) issued from Freshpet for the reported moldy products. But we did find one customer complaint of all three dogs becoming ill after inadvertently eating the moldy food; one dog even died. Freshpet’s response? “FreshPet sent two $20.00 coupons for more food and paid the vet bills … The CEO said something to me about people making up stories to drive the stocks down.

Still think “voluntary enforcement” is good enough for your dog and the food he eats?

What You May Not Know About “Made in the USA”

After the huge pet food/treat recalls in 2007 (killing more than an estimated thousand dogs (many cats also died) due to an imported contaminated ingredient, melamine, from China and this had been going on for SEVEN years before any recalls were issued), consumers no longer had confidence in pet food or treats from outside the USA. So it soon became a popular and common practice to label pet foods and treats with “Made in the USA” (along with even the American flag) in an attempt to provide consumers with a false sense of security that these products were safe and made in the United States.

Made in USAWhile the actual food may be made (assembled) in the USA, some or many of the individual ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, supplements and fillers) may actually be sourced from outside the USA! Our research indicated outsourced ingredients coming from the following countries including: Canada, India, Italy, Morocco, Germany, France, Indonesia, Egypt, China, Philippines, New Zealand, Switzerland, Netherlands, Israel, Argentina, Spain, Australia and Scotland.

If the FDA and USDA are not looking out for the well-being of our pets, do you really trust that other countries are more concerned about the health of your pets over their profits?

What Should You Do?

Do your research and make sure the “experts” you’re looking to for accurate and non-biased information are fully supported by pet food consumers (like you and me) and NOT the pet food companies (because that “ax” they have to grind is literally worth billions of dollars!).

Follow – or subscribe, if possible – to pet food recall alerts. We recommend subscribing or following several different sources to get the latest information as quickly as possible:

To learn more about your dog’s food, please visit the following websites and subscribe to their newsletters to stay current on the latest information and recommendations:


Disclosure: We want you to know that we have not been paid – or in any way compensated – by anyone or any manufacturer of pet/dog food or treats. The research in this posting was done and presented here out of a true love for dogs and their best health and safety. Our company, Cold Noses News, was founded on the belief that when people know better, they do better; and our mission is to bring our readers – fellow dog lovers – the very best information upon which to base their decisions for their furry, four-legged best friends.


Memo From Your Dog: Tomorrow is “National Dog Biscuit Day!”

dog-bones-350092_640Please excuse us as we interrupt your Monday for a very important announcement from your four-legged family member: tomorrow is “National Dog Biscuit Day” (Tuesday, February 23rd).

You’re welcome!

It’s been a pet-worthy month for those critters we welcome into our homes, onto our couches and into our beds.  From “Pet Dental Health Month” and “Responsible Pet Owners Month” to “Love Your Pet Day” (on February 20th) and finally to close out the month, “National Dog Biscuit Day” (coming up tomorrow, Tuesday, February 23rd).

Oh,  and by the way? Your dog(s) would really love some FRESH, HOMEMADE dog biscuits …  🙂

Now wait! Before you panic and run to Walmart for that industrial-sized box of Ol’ Roy biscuits that probably taste like stale old concrete,  making yummy dog biscuits is not as hard as you may think! It’s also a fun family activity which makes your home smell SO good and your dog ever so grateful!

To make it even easier, we’re going to give you a foolproof, simple recipe that our own resident Great Danes have tasted and given four-paws up to … Paws Lick’n Chick’n Cheesy Bites! Just seven ingredients you may already have in your kitchen too!

Ready? Here we go …


Paws Lick’n Chick’n Cheesy Bites
3 cups white flour
3/4 cup yellow cornmeal
1 cup chicken broth
4 tablespoons softened margarine (we prefer using butter)

2 cups shredded low-fat cheddar cheese

1 egg +1 tablespoon milk

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Combine flour, cornmeal, chicken broth, margarine (butter) and cheese.

Knead dough for 3 minutes. Apply a light layer of flour to rolling surface and rolling pin. Roll dough to 1/4 thickness and stamp out biscuits with your favorite cookie cutter (we like shapes like bones and fire hydrants!). Place on ungreased cookie sheet(s).

Beat egg and milk together and brush on top of biscuits.

Bake for 35 minutes or golden brown.

Makes two dozen biscuits and one VERY happy dog!

Are Holiday Treats Dog-Friendly?

The holidays are quickly approaching with mouth-watering smells and delectable seasonal treats!

Something else is coming too … sad, SAD puppy eyes!

While most of us will probably indulge during the season, it doesn’t necessarily mean our dogs should follow our lead.

You may actually be surprised by some of the holiday foods and/or ingredients your four-legged family member should not partake of; below is a quick list.


Want to know about additional foods and WHY they are bad for your dog?

Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!

Want a dog-friendly treat you can make in advance for those oh-so-sad puppy eyes?

Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!


iStock_000013402168XSmallAnd remember … the smaller the dog, the faster – and more toxic – the adverse effect.

So keep these items out of reach of your inquisitive (and always  hungry) resident canine!

  • Pumpkin Pie, Filling or Mix
  • Avocados and/or guacamole
  • Onions and garlic (included powdered, raw, cooked and dehydrated)
  • Grapes, raisins and currants
  • Fat Trimmings
  • Unbaked yeast dough

Want to know more? Click here to email us for a copy of our November Newsletter!

Psstt … An important secret about the Pet Food Industry.

Dog-Eating-SmallIt’s called “ingredient splitting” and is the topic of our main article in the upcoming September issue of the Cold Noses Newsletter.

It’s also the sneaky little secret the Pet Food Industry does NOT want you to know about because it artificially inflates some ingredients (like meat) to the top of pet food labels.

Subscribe today and hand-out to your customers to help them know – and do – better on behalf of their beloved 4-legged companions with the important information they need to know behind the “Science” of Pet Food Labeling.