Please Help Us Help Others.

The holidays are a wonderful time for most of us. Families come together and create new, happy memories, eat lots of wonderful food and eagerly open presents.

But for many people, the winter season can be a difficult time trying to stay warm and still have enough food to eat for not only themselves and their children, but also for their furry family members.

Please support your local pantries to help those in need. The simpliest things can mean the most to those who need help. And let us know about the pet pantries in your area so we can add them to our website to help even more people this holiday season.

Email us directly at Bobbie@ColdNosesNews.com, click on the images to email us or leave a message below.

Thank you and Happy Holidays everyone!

Poinsettia … Holiday Friend or Foe?

The holidays are coming! Trees, decorations and beautiful, festive plants are appearing everywhere!

But, if you have dogs in your home, are you hesitant to bring the traditional poinsettia plant into your home?

It’s true that poinsettias have traditionally been considered poisonous to pets.

However, the truth is that they are “non” to “mildly” toxic. Poinsettias are actually more prone to giving your pet a mild rash if they brush against it; or, if they ingest it, just mild-to-no stomach discomfort.

So go ahead and enjoy this gorgeous plant!

Learn more about which holiday blooms and buds are toxic to Fido by clicking here.

Beware the Dangers of Fall for Your Dog.

Ahh, fall is in the air! Beautiful foliage and temperatures that have dropped.

But don’t let down your guard when it comes to protecting your dog from potential autumn dangers, including:

  • Antifreeze
  • Mushrooms
  • Snakes
  • Rodents
  • Compost Piles/Bins

Keep reading to learn how to protect your pup from autumn dangers.

Antifreeze is a Sweet Menace

Antifreeze (an ethylene glycol-based engine coolant) unfortunately offers a sweet smell that attracts curious pets.

A mere 8 ounces can kill a 75-pound dog and as little as half a teaspoon can kill an average-sized cat.

What You Should Do: Use “Low Tox” antifreeze made of propylene glycol instead. While not completely non-toxic, they are less toxic and could mean the difference between life and death if your pet comes across a spill. 

Mushrooms Pose a Natural Toxin

Autumn means mushroom season! While only 1% of them are highly toxic to pets, prevention is always best because that 1% can cause life-threatening problems. (One of the most dangerous is the Amanita phalloides or death cap mushroom, found throughout the United States.) Since the proper identification of mushrooms can be very difficult, prevention is the most effective way to protect your pet.

What You Should Do: Learn which toxic mushrooms grow in your locality and avoid those areas. Also, keep your dog on a leash to protect them.

Contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 immediately if you witness your pet eating a wild mushroom.

Snakes … oh my!

Snakes are busy getting ready for their winter hibernation which means they may be out and about even more with the cooler temperatures.

What You Should Do: Familiarize yourself with the local venomous snakes. Avoid the areas they are typically found; and again, keep your dog on a leash to protect them.

Heat-Seeking Rodents 

Rodents are also hard at work at finding warmer places to call home during the winter months especially indoors. Consequently, this is the season for prevalent use of rat and mouse poisons as people begin to winterize their dwellings. As toxic poisons meant to kill small rodents, if ingested, these same poisons can potentially be fatal for your pets (particularly for smaller dogs and cats).

Another risk of rodenticides is  called relay toxicity.

“In other words, if your dog eats a large number of dead mice poisoned by rodenticides, they can experience secondary effects,” explains Dr. Ahna Brutlag, Assistant Director of Veterinary Services at Pet Poison Helpline.

Also keep in mind: even if YOU are not using rodent poisons, your neighbor(s) may be using them on their property.

What You Should Do: Only use these fatal toxins in places that are inaccessible to dogs, pets and even children and keep your dogs confined to your property.

Composts are NOT Dog-Friendly

Yes, your compost is environment-friendly and waste-reducing, but it might also be dangerous to your dog(s), pets, wildlife and even children.

As the contents of your compost pile or bin break down, dangerous pathogens (illness- or disease-causing agents) and tremorgenic mycotoxins (poisons from molds which can cause tremors or even seizures) are created and can seriously harm – or even kill – your dog and other pets.

Even small ingested amounts can lead to tremors or seizures within as little as 30 minutes to several hours.

What You Should Do:

  • Never compost dairy, grains, nuts, legumes, breads or meats due to their tendency to become moldy.
  • Use tightly sealed and secured compost containers.

Learn more from our post: Psst … Your Compost may not be Dog-Friendly!

 


To learn more about autumn dangers for your dog, go to ASPCA.org and Pet Poison Helpline.


 

Help! My Pet Just Ate Something Bad for Them!

We’re SO excited to be a Featured Blogger on Grandma Lucy’s blog especially in time for Halloween!

Go check out our guest blog and learn:

  • What foods are bad (not “dog-friendly) for your dog.
  • The symptoms your dog ate something bad.
  • What to do if your dog begins exhibiting these symptoms.

 


Thank YOU Grandma Lucy’s for helping to keep our pets safe!


 

Improve Your Health and Sex Appeal: Get a Dog!

You’ve probably heard that a dog is good for your health; both mentally and physically! From giving us a reason to exercise every day (which also lowers your blood pressure and cholesterol), to helping relieve stress and boost our mood, dogs make a real impact on our overall well-being each and every day.

But now, there just might be another reason to get a dog … improving your sex appeal!

Yes, all you single people out there, a dog can be an effective “social tool” in attracting the attention of a potential companion!

In a recent study, 1,210 single pet-owners registered on Match.com (61% women and 39% men) were polled to see how pets influence their dating habits and preferences. The result? Thirty-five percent of women and twenty-six percent of men said they were more attracted to someone if they owned a pet; and women were even LESS likely to to date someone who simply didn’t like pets!

Now, before you rush out and get that K9 ball of fur, be forewarned that not all pets are created woman-888389_640equal! This study also revealed that bigger just might be better when it comes to men’s preferences in the romantic influence of a pet. About twenty-eight percent of the men in the study admitted that if their date’s pet could fit into her purse … that would be a major turn-off!

So while a dog might not be able to make up for a lousy personality, lack of social skills or knock-you-out halitosis, the results do seem to indicate that having a canine friend may help improve your dating chances.


To learn more about the health benefits, go to: “All You Need to Know About Pets Improving Your Health.


Source: “Having a Dog Makes You Sexier, Study Says” on News.Health.com.

K9 Dental Products: What You Must Know

As is typical throughout life, not all things are created equal.

Including the dental products being created and advertised for our beloved family dogs; and what you don’t know could hurt your dog!

Over the next few weeks, Cold Noses News is going to reveal the SEVEN ingredients you NEVER want to find in YOUR dog’s dental product; regardless of what the experts, gurus or even professionals may tell you.

We’ll teach you what names and terms to look for on the label for each ingredient as well as the very real and potential effects each can have on your dog.

Don’t be Fooled

As you search for an effective – and safe – product for your dog’s dental health, don’t be fooled by pretty labels, fancy advertising, “healthy” images or even these buzz words below:

  • 100% Natural
  • All-Natural
  • Organic
  • Safe
  • Healthy
  • Non-Toxic
  • Botanical
  • Vet-Approved
  • Recommended by Vets

Your Dog’s Health Depends on You

Always do your research first to ensure any claims are actually true, for your peace of mind and more importantly, for the well-being of your dog.

Note: the researched information we will be presenting over the next few weeks is only a singular look at each of these seven individual ingredients and does not address the potential for compounded negative effects/reactions when one – or more – of these ingredients are combined.

Also keep in mind, the smaller the dog, the greater – and faster -the adverse toxic reaction(s).

And finally, dogs with pre-existing conditions, compromised health or immune systems could face even greater danger from these ingredients.

So, bookmark this page (or better yet, follow us) and learn about the seven ingredients you never want to find in your K9’s dental product.

Toxic Ingredient #1

So, let’s get started. The Number One ingredient you never, ever want to find in your dog’s dental product is … alcohol.

Some K9 dental products contain as much as 25% alcohol

Bottom line, alcohol is toxic to dogs. All dogs. Always. EVEN when the label says “Natural Derived Alcohol” … naturally derived or not, it’s toxic. Period.

So here’s what you should look for and avoid:

Please share this post (and the ones that follow) with friends, neighbors and family who love and own dogs. Keep your dog safe from dental products (or any products) that contain toxic ingredients.

 

Blue-Green Algae: Safe for Your Dog?

It’s summertime and after a long and challenging winter, the warm temperatures and summer activities feel wonderful!

But, if your dog joins you in your summer activities, it’s important to know what dangers are lurking about to effectively protect them.

In earlier posts, we’ve talked about many of the warm weather dangers waiting for your dog, including:

  • Heartworm and ticks;
  • Mulch and composting;
  • Deadly rattlesnakes driven out of their natural homes due to excessive rain;
  • The most toxic plant to your dog, the Water Hemlock; and
  • The tiny, but deadly foxtails.

Today’s subject is something you also find in the summer; especially in warm, stagnant ponds and lakes with low water flow which may also receive runoff from fertilized fields; namely, blue-green algae. Runoff with residual fertilizer creates an excess of nitrogen and phosphorus in the warm water which leads to an overgrowth of algae, typically called a “bloom” (a floating mat of scum).

Not All Algae is Created Equal

Not all blue-green algae is toxic. Spirulina, a freshwater, blue-green algae, is actually a beneficial whole food supplement (i.e., superfood) for humans and animals. However, in the case of toxic blue-green algae, even a casual encounter presents a life-threatening emergency for dogs and pets.

“Harmful (algae) blooms usually smell bad and resemble pea soup, green paint or floating mats of scum.” (Dr. Karen Becker)

Since it’s practically impossible to determine whether algae is toxic by just looking at it, always err on the side of safety and keep your dog/pet/children and yourself out of all bodies of water where algae is present.

Even dogs wading into the water with blooms can suffer seizures and convulsions; and even breathing in droplets of algae-contaminated air can cause illness.

Symptoms of Blue-Green Algae Toxicity

Blue-green algae produces deadly and toxic compounds which can cause:

  • Vomiting and diarrhea;
  • Lethargy, shock and coma;
  • Excessive panting and salivation;
  • Liver damage and failure;
  • Blood in the stool; or a black, tarry stool;
  • Respiratory tract inflammation and breathing difficulties;
  • Irritation of the skin, eyes, nose and  throat.
  • Nervous system damage; muscle tremors or rigidity; seizures; and
  • Death in dogs;

in as little as 30 to 60 minutes after exposure!

If you suspect your dog/pet has been exposed to blue-green algae, even briefly, immediate emergency vet care is necessary.

Since it’s much easier to avoid algae toxicity than to attempt treatment after exposure, keep your dog leashed and protected from the dangers that lurk in the summer sun and heat.

Final Notes on Blue-Green Algae

Blue-green algae is also harmful (but usually not lethal) to humans causing a rash/reddening of the skin, hives, blistering, runny nose and irritated eyes and throat. Ingestion of this toxic algae can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, throat irritation and muscle pain.

Blue-green algae also poses a danger to horses, cattle, sheep, goats, llamas, cats and birds.


To learn more about blue-green algae:

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