RECALL: Just Food for Dogs

Just Food for Dogs has issued their first-ever recall after a report from a customer of vomiting and diarrhea after her dogs ate their Turducken product.

In a detailed email from Founder, Shawn Buckley, it was confirmed that one batch of Turducken special (made in their West Hollywood kitchen and code dated: WH 11/18/18) did test positive for Listeria. The dogs who were affected were switched to another food and made a full recovery, without veterinarian intervention, within a day.

Why the Recall

The returned Turducken food was tested and subsequently confirmed the presence of Listeria. The source of the contamination has been traced to the human-grade green beans used in the Turducken recipe.

Based on these preliminary results, Just Food for Dogs is voluntarily:

  • Expanding the Turducken recall to all batch dates.
  • Recalling two other recipes containing green beans:
    • Beef & Russet Potato; and
    • Fish & Sweet Potato.
  • Notifying the FDA as the contaminated green beans may also affect the human food supply.

Severe disease from Listeria in dogs is rare. In fact, Listeria is of more concern to humans. Healthy dogs may experience no signs from listeria contamination, but elderly or weakened dogs may experience vomiting and/or diarrhea.

What to do Next

Consumers are urged to properly dispose of any affected product.

Consumers may also email ( or call (866-726-9509) Just Food for Dogs for an immediate refund. Shawn Buckley can be reached directly at or 949-378-2927.


Source: Truth About Pet Food: Just Food for Dogs Pet Food Recall.

New Year’s Eve and Your Dog

Now that Christmas has moved on, it’s time to give some thought to the upcoming New Year’s Eve celebrations … and your dog. While we humans love the excitement, parties and fireworks, it’s important to realize that not all dogs agree with our enthusiasm!

Last year, we wrote a very detailed post on planning ahead for the New Year’s celebrations in order to help your dog enjoy the time safely and calmly. You can read it here.

This year, we want to focus specifically on fireworks. We are incredibly lucky that our Great Danes actually enjoy fireworks no matter the time of year! They always join us outside on the deck and watch the show over Lake Tahoe. But not all dogs are so placid when it comes to loud noises and bright, unpredictable bursts of light and color.

How does YOUR dog react?

Just like humans, each dog reacts differently to loud noises. (A personal note: after living in a war zone for several years, fireworks were very difficult for me to deal with after returning to the United States. Finally, after many years, I can enjoy them without flinching.)

Remember, your dog’s hearing is ultra-sensitive. According to

The frequencies that dogs hear are much higher and lower than what humans can hear. Dogs hear a frequency range of 40 to 60,000 Hz while a human range is between 20 and 20,000 Hz. Because of this, dogs have a difficult time with very loud noises. Sounds that may be acceptable to you can be uncomfortable to a dog.

Is it any wonder that fireworks can rattle even the most tranquil dog?

So, is Your Dog Afraid?

When dogs are afraid, they exhibit the following symptoms:

  • Cowering or hiding
  • Barking or growling
  • Trembling or shaking
  • Clinging to their owners

Changes in Energy are Also Important

Another important fact to remember is that all dogs feel energy. Some energy is expressed in frequencies, waves and vibrations; including light and sound. This is why some dogs become overwhelmed with the onslaught of both the sights and sounds of fireworks.

Options for a Sound-Sensitive Dog

The following are suggestions; always discuss the best option with your own veterinarian. (Note: We are not compensated for any of the suggested products below.)

  • Wear them out with exercise earlier in the day
  • Distract them with play or their favorite toy or bone
  • Provide a “safe” place; a quiet room (close the windows and curtains) or crate
  • Massage
  • Calming Wraps:
  • Play canine-friendly “healing” frequencies or sound therapy
  • Homeopathic Remedies:
  • Aromatherapy/Essential Oils:
    • lavender, chamomile, ylang ylang, valerian, valor and vetiver):
      1. Spray a small amount on your hands and massage your dog (including their chest and paws) or spray some on a bandana and tie loosely around the neck)
      2. Mist your house, dog beds and favorite hiding spots with an oil/water blend

Please Help Us Help Others.

The holidays are a wonderful time for most of us. Families come together and create new, happy memories, eat lots of wonderful food and eagerly open presents.

But for many people, the winter season can be a difficult time trying to stay warm and still have enough food to eat for not only themselves and their children, but also for their furry family members.

Please support your local pantries to help those in need. The simpliest things can mean the most to those who need help. And let us know about the pet pantries in your area so we can add them to our website to help even more people this holiday season.

Email us directly at, click on the images to email us or leave a message below.

Thank you and Happy Holidays everyone!

Poinsettia … Holiday Friend or Foe?

The holidays are coming! Trees, decorations and beautiful, festive plants are appearing everywhere!

But, if you have dogs in your home, are you hesitant to bring the traditional poinsettia plant into your home?

It’s true that poinsettias have traditionally been considered poisonous to pets.

However, the truth is that they are “non” to “mildly” toxic. Poinsettias are actually more prone to giving your pet a mild rash if they brush against it; or, if they ingest it, just mild-to-no stomach discomfort.

So go ahead and enjoy this gorgeous plant!

Learn more about which holiday blooms and buds are toxic to Fido by clicking here.

Beware the Dangers of Fall for Your Dog.

Ahh, fall is in the air! Beautiful foliage and temperatures that have dropped.

But don’t let down your guard when it comes to protecting your dog from potential autumn dangers, including:

  • Antifreeze
  • Mushrooms
  • Snakes
  • Rodents
  • Compost Piles/Bins

Keep reading to learn how to protect your pup from autumn dangers.

Antifreeze is a Sweet Menace

Antifreeze (an ethylene glycol-based engine coolant) unfortunately offers a sweet smell that attracts curious pets.

A mere 8 ounces can kill a 75-pound dog and as little as half a teaspoon can kill an average-sized cat.

What You Should Do: Use “Low Tox” antifreeze made of propylene glycol instead. While not completely non-toxic, they are less toxic and could mean the difference between life and death if your pet comes across a spill. 

Mushrooms Pose a Natural Toxin

Autumn means mushroom season! While only 1% of them are highly toxic to pets, prevention is always best because that 1% can cause life-threatening problems. (One of the most dangerous is the Amanita phalloides or death cap mushroom, found throughout the United States.) Since the proper identification of mushrooms can be very difficult, prevention is the most effective way to protect your pet.

What You Should Do: Learn which toxic mushrooms grow in your locality and avoid those areas. Also, keep your dog on a leash to protect them.

Contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 immediately if you witness your pet eating a wild mushroom.

Snakes … oh my!

Snakes are busy getting ready for their winter hibernation which means they may be out and about even more with the cooler temperatures.

What You Should Do: Familiarize yourself with the local venomous snakes. Avoid the areas they are typically found; and again, keep your dog on a leash to protect them.

Heat-Seeking Rodents 

Rodents are also hard at work at finding warmer places to call home during the winter months especially indoors. Consequently, this is the season for prevalent use of rat and mouse poisons as people begin to winterize their dwellings. As toxic poisons meant to kill small rodents, if ingested, these same poisons can potentially be fatal for your pets (particularly for smaller dogs and cats).

Another risk of rodenticides is  called relay toxicity.

“In other words, if your dog eats a large number of dead mice poisoned by rodenticides, they can experience secondary effects,” explains Dr. Ahna Brutlag, Assistant Director of Veterinary Services at Pet Poison Helpline.

Also keep in mind: even if YOU are not using rodent poisons, your neighbor(s) may be using them on their property.

What You Should Do: Only use these fatal toxins in places that are inaccessible to dogs, pets and even children and keep your dogs confined to your property.

Composts are NOT Dog-Friendly

Yes, your compost is environment-friendly and waste-reducing, but it might also be dangerous to your dog(s), pets, wildlife and even children.

As the contents of your compost pile or bin break down, dangerous pathogens (illness- or disease-causing agents) and tremorgenic mycotoxins (poisons from molds which can cause tremors or even seizures) are created and can seriously harm – or even kill – your dog and other pets.

Even small ingested amounts can lead to tremors or seizures within as little as 30 minutes to several hours.

What You Should Do:

  • Never compost dairy, grains, nuts, legumes, breads or meats due to their tendency to become moldy.
  • Use tightly sealed and secured compost containers.

Learn more from our post: Psst … Your Compost may not be Dog-Friendly!


To learn more about autumn dangers for your dog, go to and Pet Poison Helpline.


Help! My Pet Just Ate Something Bad for Them!

We’re SO excited to be a Featured Blogger on Grandma Lucy’s blog especially in time for Halloween!

Go check out our guest blog and learn:

  • What foods are bad (not “dog-friendly) for your dog.
  • The symptoms your dog ate something bad.
  • What to do if your dog begins exhibiting these symptoms.


Thank YOU Grandma Lucy’s for helping to keep our pets safe!


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